Circumcision For Adult

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Update Date 12/05/2020 . 4 mins read
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Know the basics

What is Circumcision for adult?

A circumcision is a surgical removal of skin that covers the tip of the penis, which is called the foreskin. Circumcision in adult males are usually recommended only for medical reasons.

Adult male circumcision is much less common than infant circumcision. The most common reasons for adult circumcision are medical that may include the following:

  • Paraphimosis (cannot return a retracted foreskin to its normal position);
  • Phimosis (foreskin is too tight; can’t retract from the head);
  • Recurrent inflammation of the foreskin (e.g., balanitis, posthitis);
  • Non-medical reasons for adult circumcision include social, cultural, personal, and religious factors.

It is best to talk to your doctor to determine if circumcision is the best solution.

Why is Circumcision for adult performed?

Your doctor will examine your medical condition and medical history. Your doctor may recommend circumcision for possible health benefits, that includes:

  • Easier hygiene.Circumcision makes it simpler to wash the penis. Washing beneath the foreskin of an uncircumcised penis is generally easy, however.
  • Decreased risk of urinary tract infections.The overall risk of urinary tract infections in males is low, but these infections are more common in uncircumcised males. Severe infections early in life can lead to kidney problems later on.
  • Decreased risk of sexually transmitted infections.Circumcised men might have a lower risk of certain sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Still, safe sexual practices remain essential.
  • Prevention of penile problems.Occasionally, the foreskin on an uncircumcised penis can be difficult or impossible to retract (phimosis). This can lead to inflammation of the foreskin or head of the penis.
  • Decreased risk of penile cancer.Although cancer of the penis is rare, it’s less common in circumcised men. In addition, cervical cancer is less common in the female sexual partners of circumcised men.

Understand the risks

What are the risks of Circumcision for adult?

Before receiving a circumcision, you should know the following:

  • As with all surgical procedures, there is a risk for bleeding and infection. Other risks include severe bruising (hematoma), poor cosmetic result, and a change in sensation during sex.
  • Circumcision doesn’t affect fertility, nor is circumcision generally thought to enhance or detract from sexual pleasure for men or their partners.
  • In rare cases, the foreskin may not heal properly. Please notify your doctor if it takes more than 10 days to recover.

Complications are uncommon. If they do occur, complications following adult circumcision may include the following:

  • Buried penis (penile shaft buried below the surface of the pubic skin);
  • Chordee (abnormal downward bend of the penis);
  • Complications from the anesthetic;
  • Meatal stenosis (narrowing of the urine channel [urethra] at the top of the penis);
  • Poor cosmetic appearance;
  • Skin bridges (foreskin reattaching to the glans);
  • Tearing of the sutures, usually due to erection.

It is important you understand the risks and complications before having this surgery. If you have any questions, please consult with your doctor or surgeon for more information.

Know what happens

How do I prepare for Circumcision for adult?

Before circumcision, the doctor will explain the risks and benefits of the procedure. If you’re pursuing circumcision for yourself, you’ll likely need to provide written consent for the procedure. You must discuss to your doctor about your recent medications, your allergies or any of your health conditions and before having an operation, you will meet your anaesthetist and plan your anaesthetic together. It’s important to follow the instructions about when to stop eating and drinking prior to surgery.

What happens during Circumcision for adult?

Adult male circumcision is more complicated than infant circumcision, and is commonly performed using one of the following techniques:

The guided forceps

The guided forceps is the simplest technique. In this procedure, the foreskin is pulled forward over the glans with a pair of forceps, and the foreskin is then snipped, using the edge of the forceps as a guide.

The dorsal slit

The dorsal slit is often preferred when treating phimosis or paraphimosis. In this procedure, a slit is made from the opening of the foreskin to a point a few centimeters in, and then a circle is cut around the glans.

Sleeve resection

Sleeve resection is more complicated, but often preferred when there is a risk for excessive bleeding. In this procedure, two parallel cuts are made along the shaft of the penis, resulting in a thin band or sleeve of detached foreskin. When this is removed, the top and bottom portions of the foreskin are attached with dissolving sutures.

Right before surgery, the pubic area is thoroughly scrubbed, and pubic hair may be shaved or clipped. An aesthetic cream may be applied or a local aesthetic is injected into the base of the penis. This may be followed with additional injections in a ring around the shaft.

If you have any questions or concerns, please consult with your doctor or surgeon for more information.

Recovery

What happens after Circumcision for adult?

It may take about 7-10 days for the penis to heal. It is normal to feel sore with some pain. The penis might also look red, swollen or bruised. For proper care, it is recommended to do the following:

  • Apply pressure to the area with a clean cloth for 10 minutes when there is light bleeding.
  • Wash with plain soap and water after the dressing is removed. Usually your doctor will remove the dressing after 24-48 hours after surgery.
  • Avoid sexual activity or masturbation. Erection can cause the suture to rupture. This may affect the recovery process and cause complications. You may need to avoid 6-8 weeks. Talk to your doctor for further information.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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