Week by Week

What pregnant women need to know in week 12 of pregnancy?

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Baby Development

How is my baby growing?

Your baby is now the size of a lime and weighs about 15 g with a height of about 5 cm long from head to toe. During this week, most of your baby’s organs are developed but still needs the rest of the time to full mature to function properly. Out of these developed organs, are the organs within the digestive system. Your baby is starting to practice movements for digestion. This may involve reflexes such as grasping, sucking and even hiccups. You may not feel these movements yet but in a few weeks it will be very noticeable.

The bone marrow in your baby’s bones are producing white blood cells, which are responsible to fight infections. Along with building a strong immune system, your baby’s pituitary gland are starting to produce important hormones that will help your child make babies in the future.

Body & Life Changes

How is my body changing?

The increased blood flow is creating your beautiful pregnancy glow but it may also cause your dizzy spells. Your pregnancy hormones, which includes progesterone, causes your blood vessels to relax and widen. This allows more blood flow to deliver important nutrients to your baby. This can cause your blood pressure to decrease and less blood flow to your brain, leading to dizzy spells. Your may feel more dizzy when you stand up too quickly or move too quickly. This is why your doctor will recommend you to take it easy. Another reason that may cause you to feel dizzy is low blood sugar levels. This can occur when you don’t eat regularly or forget to eat. Make sure to keep some healthy snacks at your desk or in your purse. You never know when it can come in handy. To help you manage your dizzy spells, you can lie down or sit down with your head between your knees and take deep breathes. You can also try drinking water or fruit juice.

What should I be concerned about?

At this time, you probably have not gained much weight. As you enter your second trimester you will gain more weight. This is because you will need more nutrients and energy to support your growing baby.

You may gain weight too quickly during the early stages of pregnancy. This is partly because you think you’re eating for two, but in fact your growing fetus does not need that much nutritional needs. You may also crave foods that are high in calories, fat and sugar. All the things that is bad but taste so good. To control your weight gain, you can create a meal plan. You can consult with your doctor or a nutritionist to get the most nutrients from the least amount of calories. Your diet will most likely consists of fruits, vegetables and healthy fats such as nuts and beans.

Doctor Visits

What should I tell my doctor?

If you are still concerned about your pregnancy weight, talk to your doctor. It is not healthy to keep your worries to yourself. Your doctor can help you find ways to manage your weight gain. If you are not gaining enough weight, this can hurt your baby. It is important to gain weight at a steady rate to give your baby adequate amount of nutrients for proper development. Talk to your doctor to find out your Body Mass Index (BMI). This can help you calculate approximately how much weight you should gain during your pregnancy.

What tests should I know about?

Last week, your doctor probably already tested your blood and performed an ultrasound to screen for any chromosomal abnormalities. The most common chromosomal abnormality is Down syndrome. The ultrasound is to measure the thickness of the neck, which is also called nuchal translucency. You may get your results this week. Keep in mind these results are estimating your risk. If your results confirm that you have high risk, this means you will need diagnostic tests to confirm your baby have a chromosomal abnormality. The choice to perform these tests is personal. There is a 1% risk of causing a miscarriage. You should talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of these tests.

Health & Safety

What should I know about being healthy and safe while pregnant?

Keeping yourself and your growing baby safe and healthy is very important. Here are some things you may be concerned about:

Baby bump

As you enter the second trimester, your baby bump will become more noticeable. This means your baby is growing but it can also mean you will have more lower back pain. When your belly continues to grow, your center of gravity will change. It is important to be aware of your body and take extra measures to protect your back. You can start a prenatal yoga class or set aside time to stretch in the early morning or before bed. This can help your back adjust to the new changes. You should not strain yourself or make any sudden movements.

Your growing baby bump also means your uterus is growing. This can increase the risk of pressing on your sciatic nerve, which is the largest nerve in the body that runs from the lower back to your buttocks to the back of your legs and down to your ankles and feet. This causes a sharp and tingling pain in the back of your butt, also known as sciatica. This is normal is temporary. Not everyone experience this pain. It can be more common during your third trimester but some women may experience now. To help manage the pain, you can start by resting. Other ways that can help is slowing down your weight gain, doing some pelvic and kegel exercises and swimming to keep the weight off the nerve.

Anemia

During pregnancy, one of your top priority is to provide adequate nutrients to your baby. Vitamins and nutrients needed include folic acid, vitamin B1 and iron, which are all needed for red blood cell production. If you are a vegetarian, make sure you supplementing for these vitamins. If you lack any of these vitamins, you have a higher risk of getting anemia. Some signs and symptoms of anemia include fatigue, pale skin and weakness. Talk to your doctor if you suspect you have anemia.

Let’s meet in week 13 to see how you are feeling and how your baby is developing.

Hello Health Group does not offer any advice, diagnosis or medical treatment.

msBahasa Malaysia

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