Week by Week

What do you need to know to care for your 5 week old baby?

By Medically reviewed by Dr. Duyen Le

Development & Behavior

How should my baby be developing?

By the first week of the first month, your baby may lift his head briefly, maybe when he’s lying on his stomach. In addition, your baby can also focus on looking into the faces of other people, especially you, who always take care of them.

At this stage, your baby may say gurgling, cooing, humming or crooning in their mouth to express their feelings. Some babies also begin squealing and laughing.

How to support my baby?

Make cooing, be fun, respond and talk regularly with your child. They will enjoy your attention at this stage. You should talk directly with themi. You can also use your baby’s language to talk and teach them about the structure and function of language. Also, communicating with your baby is also a way to increase the closeness and maternal love between you and your baby.

Health & Safety

What should I discuss with my doctor?

Depending on the health of your child, the doctor will schedule the examining. However, if you take them to the doctor this week, please consult with your doctor about the following issues:

  • Questions about how you and baby and the rest of the family are doing at home, and about baby’s eating, sleeping, and general progress.
  • Measurement of baby’s weight, length, and head circumference, and plotting of progress since birth.
  • Review baby’s ability about their hearing and vision.

What should I know?

Here are some things you should know about:

Spitting up

In the first months of life, most babies spit up occasionally; some spit up with every feeding. Sometimes a baby wisely spits up because they have eaten too much. There are no sure cures for spitting up, but you can try to minimize the air gulping around mealtimes that can contribute to it. While ordinary spitting is normal and no cause for concern, some kinds of spitting up are, however, signal possible problems. Call the doctor if that your baby’s spitting up is associated with poor weight gain or prolonged gagging and coughing, or if their vomit is brown or green in color.

Milk allergy

Milk allergy is the most common food allergy in infants. A baby who is having a severe allergic in response to milk will usually vomit frequently and have loose, watery stools, possibly tinged with blood. Some babies who are allergic to milk may also have eczema, hives, wheezing, and a nasal discharge or stuffiness when exposed to milk protein. There is no way to test for milk allergy, except through trial and error. If you suspect milk allergy, discuss the possibility with your baby’s doctor before taking any action.

Bowel movements

It is normal for breastfed infants to have very soft, sometimes even watery, stool. But diarrhea – frequent stools that are liquidy, smelly, and may contain mucus, often accompanied with a fever or weight lossvis less common among children who dine on breast milk alone. If they do get diarrhea, they will recover more quickly than bottle-feed babies.

Some bottle-feed babies’ defecating space three to four days, which is considered to be normal. But if baby’s stools do not have certain shape or in the form of hard pellets, or cause pain orbleeding due to the cracks or blemishes in the anus, your baby may have constipation. If you suspect your child is constipated, consult with your doctor as soon as possible. Let your baby drink more water under the guidance of a physician to improve this situation.

My Concerns

What I am concerned about?

In the first week of the first month, there will be a lot of things that you should note.

First, determine whether your baby is getting enough milk and sufficient additional nutrients or not. These signs include:

  • Their diaper is wet when it is changed before each feeding;
  • Their urine is colorless;
  • You hear a lot of gulping and swallowing;
  • They seem to be happy and content after most feedings;
  • You experienced breast engorgement when your milk came in;
  • You notice the sensation of let-down milk leakage;
  • You don’t start menstruating during the first three months postpartum.

To help your baby sleep well, you can apply the following suggestions:

  • Give your baby a comfortable sleeping space;
  • Set the appropriate temperature for the baby;
  • Create a sense of peace to the baby;
  • Baby gets enough sleep during the day;
  • Baby’s bedroom can see daylight.

Congratulations! You have made it through week 5. We can’t wait to show you how your baby is developing in week 6.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

msBahasa Malaysia

Development & Behavior

How should my baby be developing?

By the first week of the first month, your baby may lift his head briefly, maybe when he’s lying on his stomach. In addition, your baby can also focus on looking into the faces of other people, especially you, who always take care of them.

At this stage, your baby may say gurgling, cooing, humming or crooning in their mouth to express their feelings. Some babies also begin squealing and laughing.

How to support my baby?

Make cooing, be fun, respond and talk regularly with your child. They will enjoy your attention at this stage. You should talk directly with themi. You can also use your baby’s language to talk and teach them about the structure and function of language. Also, communicating with your baby is also a way to increase the closeness and maternal love between you and your baby.

Health & Safety

What should I discuss with my doctor?

Depending on the health of your child, the doctor will schedule the examining. However, if you take them to the doctor this week, please consult with your doctor about the following issues:

  • Questions about how you and baby and the rest of the family are doing at home, and about baby’s eating, sleeping, and general progress.
  • Measurement of baby’s weight, length, and head circumference, and plotting of progress since birth.
  • Review baby’s ability about their hearing and vision.

What should I know?

Here are some things you should know about:

Spitting up

In the first months of life, most babies spit up occasionally; some spit up with every feeding. Sometimes a baby wisely spits up because they have eaten too much. There are no sure cures for spitting up, but you can try to minimize the air gulping around mealtimes that can contribute to it. While ordinary spitting is normal and no cause for concern, some kinds of spitting up are, however, signal possible problems. Call the doctor if that your baby’s spitting up is associated with poor weight gain or prolonged gagging and coughing, or if their vomit is brown or green in color.

Milk allergy

Milk allergy is the most common food allergy in infants. A baby who is having a severe allergic in response to milk will usually vomit frequently and have loose, watery stools, possibly tinged with blood. Some babies who are allergic to milk may also have eczema, hives, wheezing, and a nasal discharge or stuffiness when exposed to milk protein. There is no way to test for milk allergy, except through trial and error. If you suspect milk allergy, discuss the possibility with your baby’s doctor before taking any action.

Bowel movements

It is normal for breastfed infants to have very soft, sometimes even watery, stool. But diarrhea – frequent stools that are liquidy, smelly, and may contain mucus, often accompanied with a fever or weight lossvis less common among children who dine on breast milk alone. If they do get diarrhea, they will recover more quickly than bottle-feed babies.

Some bottle-feed babies’ defecating space three to four days, which is considered to be normal. But if baby’s stools do not have certain shape or in the form of hard pellets, or cause pain orbleeding due to the cracks or blemishes in the anus, your baby may have constipation. If you suspect your child is constipated, consult with your doctor as soon as possible. Let your baby drink more water under the guidance of a physician to improve this situation.

My Concerns

What I am concerned about?

In the first week of the first month, there will be a lot of things that you should note.

First, determine whether your baby is getting enough milk and sufficient additional nutrients or not. These signs include:

  • Their diaper is wet when it is changed before each feeding;
  • Their urine is colorless;
  • You hear a lot of gulping and swallowing;
  • They seem to be happy and content after most feedings;
  • You experienced breast engorgement when your milk came in;
  • You notice the sensation of let-down milk leakage;
  • You don’t start menstruating during the first three months postpartum.

To help your baby sleep well, you can apply the following suggestions:

  • Give your baby a comfortable sleeping space;
  • Set the appropriate temperature for the baby;
  • Create a sense of peace to the baby;
  • Baby gets enough sleep during the day;
  • Baby’s bedroom can see daylight.

Congratulations! You have made it through week 5. We can’t wait to show you how your baby is developing in week 6.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources
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