Generic Name: Biotin

Uses

What is biotin used for?

Biotin is a vitamin that is found in small amounts in numerous foods.

Biotin is used for preventing and treating biotin deficiency associated with pregnancy, long-term tube feeding, malnutrition, and rapid weight loss. It is also used orally for hair loss, brittle nails, skin rash in infants (seborrheic dermatitis), diabetes, and mild depression.

How does it work?

There are not enough studies about how biotin works. Please discuss with your doctor for more information. However, it is known that biotin is an important component of enzymes in the body that break down certain substances like fats, carbohydrates, and others.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using biotin?

Consult with your doctor or pharmacist if:

  • You are pregnant or breastfeeding. This is because, while you are expecting or feeding a baby, you should only take medicines on the recommendation of a doctor.
  • You are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription.
  • You have allergy with any substances of biotin or other medications or other herbs.
  • You have any other illnesses, disorders, or medical conditions.
  • You have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals.

The regulations for a supplement are less strict than the regulations for a drug. More studies are needed to determine its safety. The benefits of taking this supplement must outweigh the risks before use. Consult with your doctor for more information.

How safe is biotin?

Biotin is likely safe for most people when taken appropriately and by mouth. Biotin is well tolerated when used at recommended dosages. It is possibly safe when injected into the muscles and used appropriately.

Special precautions & warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Biotin is possibly safe when used in recommended amounts during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

Kidney dialysis: People receiving kidney dialysis may need extra biotin. Check with your health care provider.

Side effects

What kind of side effects may I have from biotin?

If you have any concerns about side effects, please consult your doctor.

Interactions

What interactions may I have with biotin?

Biotin may interact with your current medications or medical conditions. Consult with your doctor before using.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your herbalist or doctor before using this medication.

What is the usual dose for biotin?

There is no recommended dietary allowance (RDA) established for biotin. The adequate intakes (AI) for biotin are 7 mcg for infants 0-12 months, 8 mcg for children 1-3 years, 12 mcg for children 4-8 years, 20 mcg for children 9-13 years, 25 mcg for adolescents 14-18 years, 30 mcg for adults over 18 years and pregnant women, and 35 mcg for breast-feeding women.

The dose for biotin may be different for every patient. The dose that you take depends on your age, health, and several other conditions. Supplements are not always safe. Please discuss with your doctor for your appropriate dosage.

What form does biotin come in?

Biotin may be available in the following forms:

  • Softgels
  • Capsules
  • Tablets

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Review Date: January 24, 2018 | Last Modified: January 24, 2018

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