Generic Name: Triregol Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Uses

What is Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol) used for?

Triregol® is commonly used for contraception, dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome marked.

How should I take Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol)?

You should try and take your pill at the same time every day; this will help you remember to take it. Each tablet should be swallowed with a drink. They can be taken either with or without food.

How do I store Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol)?

Triregol® is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Triregol® in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Triregol® that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush Triregol® down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol)?

Caution should be observed in patients older than 40 years. When using the drug, it is recommended to conduct an annual gynecological cytology control.

Smoking can increase the frequency and severity of side effects.

When planning pregnancy, it should be discontinued 3 months before its intended use and the occurrence of non-hormonal method of contraception.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breastfeeding?

Pregnancy

This medicine is used to prevent pregnancy and should not be taken during pregnancy. However, if the pill fails or you miss pills and you do get pregnant while taking it, there is no evidence to suggest that the pills you have already taken will harm the baby. If you think you could be pregnant while taking this pill you should stop taking it and consult your doctor immediately.

Breastfeeding

The hormones in this pill can reduce the production of breast milk. For this reason, it is not recommended for women who are breastfeeding. It should not be used until weaning, or at least six months after the birth. Other methods of contraception are more suitable for women who are breastfeeding. Ask your doctor for advice.

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol)?

Some side effects may occur when using this drug, such as:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Headache/migraine
  • Breast tenderness and enlargement
  • Weight changes
  • Retention of water in the body tissues (fluid retention)
  • Vaginal thrush (candidiasis)
  • Change in menstrual bleeding (usually lighter periods or sometimes stopping of periods)
  • Menstrual spotting or breakthrough bleeding
  • Depression
  • Decreased sex drive
  • Rise in blood pressure
  • Skin reactions
  • Irregular brown patches on the skin (chloasma)
  • Steepening of corneal curvature (which may make contact lenses uncomfortable)
  • Disturbance in liver function
  • Gallstones
  • Blood clots in the blood vessels (e.g., DVT, pulmonary embolism, heart attack, stroke – see warnings above)

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

 

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol)?

Triregol® may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol)?

Triregol® may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol)?

Triregol® may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

These health conditions are:

  • Hypersensitivity
  • Liver disease
  • Gall bladder
  • Severe diabetes
  • Endocrine system diseases
  • Disorders of lipid metabolism
  • Severe organic heart disease
  • Hypertension
  • Cerebrovascular disease
  • An increased tendency to thrombosis
  • Sickle-cell anemia
  • Chronic hemolytic anemia
  • Malignant tumors
  • Tetany
  • Dubin syndrome
  • Johnson syndrome
  • Rotor syndrome
  • Pruritus during pregnancy in history

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol).

What is the dose of Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol) for an adult?

Triregol® is a triphasic pill. Each 21 day pack contains three types of tablets, each with a slightly different dose of hormones in it. The six pink tablets contain 30 micrograms ethinylestradiol and 50 micrograms levonorgestrel, the five white tablets contain 40 micrograms ethinylestradiol and 75 micrograms levonorgestrel, and the ten ochre tablets contain 30 micrograms ethinylestradiol and 125 micrograms levonorgestrel.

Triregol® tablets must be taken in the order specified on the pack, starting with the pink tablet marked ‘1’. One tablet is taken every day for 21 days and you then have a seven-day break from pill-taking. During your seven-day break, the levels of the hormones in your blood drop, which results in a withdrawal bleed that is similar to your normal period. You start the next pack after the seven pill-free days are up, even if you are still bleeding.

You will still be protected against pregnancy in your pill-free week, provided you took all the pills correctly, you start the next packet on time and nothing else happened that could make the pill less effective (e.g., sickness, diarrhea, or taking certain other medicines ).

What is the dose of Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol) for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is Triregol® (levonorgestrel, ethinylestradiol) available?

Triregol® is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Pink Tablet, Sugar-Coated; Oral; Ethinyl Estradiol 0.03 mg; Levonorgestrel 0.05 mg
  • White Tablet, Sugar-Coated; Oral; Ethinyl Estradiol 0.04 mg; Levonorgestrel 0.075 mg
  • Dark Yellow Tablet, Sugar-Coated; Oral; Ethinyl Estradiol 0.03 mg; Levonorgestrel 0.05 mg

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

One pill missed

If you forget to take one pill, or start your new pack one day late, you should take the pill you missed as soon as possible, even if this means taking two pills at the same time. Then continue taking the rest of the pack as normal. You will still be protected against pregnancy and you don’t need to use extra contraception.

Two or more pills missed

If you forget to take two or more pills, or start your new pack two or more days late, you won’t be protected against pregnancy. You should take the last pill you missed as soon as possible, even if this means taking two pills at the same time. Leave out the other missed ones. Then continue to take your pills, one every day, as normal. You should either not have sex, or use an extra barrier method of contraception, e.g., condoms, for the next seven days.

If there are fewer than seven pills left in your pack after your last missed pill, you should finish the pack and then start a new pack straight away without a break. This means skipping your pill-free week.

If there are seven or more pills left in your pack after your last missed pill, you should finish the pack and have your seven-day break as usual before starting the next pack.

If you had unprotected sex in the seven days before you missed pills, you may need emergency contraception (the morning after pill). Ask for medical advice.

If you are confused about any of this, you can get individual advice for your circumstances from your doctor, pharmacist or local family planning clinic.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: February 18, 2017 | Last Modified: February 18, 2017

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