What is tranexamic acid?

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Generic Name: Tranexamic Acid Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is tranexamic acid used for?

This medication is used short-term in people with a certain type of bleeding disorder (hemophilia) to prevent and reduce bleeding from having a tooth pulled (extraction). It is also used in people with other high-risk bleeding conditions to control bleeding at such times as after surgery or an injury, during heavy nosebleeds, or during heavy menstrual bleeding.

Tranexamic acid works by helping the blood clot normally to prevent and stop prolonged bleeding. It belongs to a class of drugs known as anti-fibrinolytics.

How should I take tranexamic acid?

Take this medication by mouth, usually 2 to 4 times daily or as directed by your doctor.

The dosage and length of treatment is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Dosage is also based on your weight. Do not increase your dose, take it more frequently, or take it for a longer time than prescribed.

Take this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same times each day.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

How do I store tranexamic acid?

Tranexamic acid is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store tranexamic acid in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of tranexamic acid that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush tranexamic acid down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using tranexamic acid?

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of tranexamic acid injection in children.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of tranexamic acid injection in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney, liver, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving tranexamic acid injection.

Is it safe to take tranexamic acid during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There isn’t enough information about the safety of using this medication during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking this medication.

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of tranexamic acid?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using Cyklokapron and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • problems with your vision (including color vision);
  • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
  • sudden severe headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;
  • chest pain, sudden cough, wheezing, rapid breathing, coughing up blood;
  • pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in one or both legs;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • painful or difficult urination;
  • blood in your urine; or
  • feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects include:

  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
  • mild itching or rash; or
  • feeling unusually happy.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with tranexamic acid?

Tranexamic acid may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Desogestrel
  • Dienogest
  • Drospirenone
  • Estradiol Cypionate
  • Estradiol Valerate
  • Ethinyl Estradiol
  • Ethynodiol Diacetate
  • Etonogestrel
  • Levonorgestrel
  • Medroxyprogesterone Acetate
  • Mestranol
  • Norelgestromin
  • Norethindrone
  • Norgestimate
  • Norgestrel

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Anti-Inhibitor Coagulant Complex
  • Chlorpromazine
  • Tretinoin

Does food or alcohol interact with tranexamic acid?

Tranexamic acid may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with tranexamic acid?

Tranexamic acid may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Bleeding problems (bleeding in the brain) or
  • Blood clots, active or history of or
  • Head injury or
  • Vision problems (problems seeing certain colors)—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Blood vessel problems, history of or
  • Hematuria (blood in the urine) caused by or
  • Retinal artery or vein occlusion (blood clot in the eye) or
  • Seizures, history of or
  • Urinary tract problems (e.g., bleeding)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation or DIC (blood clotting problem)—Should be treated under strict supervision of an experienced doctor in treating this disorder.
  • Kidney disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Understand the dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of tranexamic acid for an adult?

For the treatment of cyclic heavy menstrual bleeding:

1,300 mg (two 650 mg tablets) orally three times a day (3,900 mg/day) for a maximum of 5 days during monthly menstruation.

For patients with hemophilia for short-term use (two to eight days) to reduce or prevent hemorrhage and reduce the need for replacement therapy during and following tooth extraction:

Immediately before dental extraction in patients with hemophilia, administer 10 mg per kg body weight intravenously. Following surgery, a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight intravenously three to four times daily, may be used for 2 to 8 days.

What is the dose of tranexamic acid for a child?

Tranexamic acid has had limited use in pediatric patients, principally in connection with tooth extraction. The limited data suggest that dosing instructions for adults can be used for pediatric patients needing therapy.

For patients with hemophilia for short-term use (two to eight days) to reduce or prevent hemorrhage and reduce the need for replacement therapy during and following tooth extraction:

Immediately before dental extraction: 10 mg per kg body weight intravenously

Following surgery: 10 mg per kg body weight intravenously three to four times daily, may be used for 2 to 8 days.

Surgery for congenital heart disease (to reduce perioperative blood loss and need for transfusions):

(not FDA approved, limited data available, dose not established, variable dosing regimens reported)

2 months to 15 years:

loading dose: 100 mg/kg intravenously, followed by 10 mg/kg/hour infusion (continued until ICU transport) and 100 mg/kg priming dose when bypass initiated;

or loading dose: 10 mg/kg intravenously, priming dose: 10 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg after protamine.

Surgery for scoliosis (to reduce perioperative blood loss and need for transfusions):

(not FDA approved, limited data available, dose not established, variable dosing regimens reported)

8 to 18 years:

loading dose: 100 mg/kg intravenously, followed by infusion: 10 mg/kg/hour until skin closure

or loading dose: 20 mg/kg intravenously, followed by 10 mg/kg/hour infusion

or loading dose: 10 mg/kg intravenously and 1 mg/kg/hour infusion.

For the treatment of cyclic heavy menstrual bleeding (ages 12 to less than 18):

1,300 mg (two 650 mg tablets) orally three times a day (3,900 mg/day) for a maximum of 5 days during monthly menstruation.

How is tranexamic acid available?

Tranexamic acid is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

Injection 100 mg/mL

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • changes in vision
  • changes in behavior or mood
  • uncontrollable shaking or twitching of a part of your body
  • rash

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of tranexamic acid, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Review Date: May 30, 2016 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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