What is tamsulosin?

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Generic Name: Tamsulosin Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is tamsulosin used for?

Tamsulosin is used by men to treat the symptoms of an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia-BPH). It does not shrink the prostate, but it works by relaxing the muscles in the prostate and the bladder. This helps to relieve symptoms of BPH such as difficulty in beginning the flow of urine, weak stream, and the need to urinate often or urgently (including during the middle of the night).

Tamsulosin belongs to a class of drugs known as alpha blockers.

Do not use this medication to treat high blood pressure.

OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

Tamsulosin may also be used to help your body “pass,” or get rid of, kidney stones through urination. It has also been used to help treat bladder problems in women.

How should I take tamsulosin?

Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily, 30 minutes after the same meal each day. Swallow this medication whole. Do not crush, chew, or open the capsules.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Tamsulosin may cause a sudden drop in your blood pressure, which could lead to dizziness or fainting. This risk is higher when you first start taking this drug, after your doctor increases your dose, or if you restart treatment after you stop taking it. During these times, avoid situations where you may be injured if you faint.

Take this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

If you have not taken this drug for several days, contact your doctor to see if you need to be restarted at a lower dose.

It may take up to 4 weeks before your symptoms improve. Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

How do I store tamsulosin?

Tamsulosin is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store tamsulosin in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of tamsulosin that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush tamsulosin down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using tamsulosin?

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Tamsulosin is not indicated for use in the pediatric population.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of tamsulosin in the elderly.

Is it safe to take tamsulosin during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Tamsulosin is not indicated for use in the pediatric population.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of tamsulosin in the elderly.

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of tamsulosin?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using tamsulosin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • chest pain;
  • fever, chills, body aches, or flu symptoms; or
  • penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer.

Serious side effects may include:

  • mild dizziness;
  • weakness, drowsiness;
  • headache;
  • nausea, diarrhea;
  • back pain;
  • blurred vision;
  • dental problems;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • abnormal ejaculation, decreased sex drive; or
  • runny nose, sore throat, cough.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with tamsulosin?

Tamsulosin may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Boceprevir

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Atazanavir
  • Carbamazepine
  • Ceritinib
  • Clarithromycin
  • Cobicistat
  • Conivaptan
  • Dabrafenib
  • Eslicarbazepine Acetate
  • Idelalisib
  • Indinavir
  • Itraconazole
  • Ketoconazole
  • Lopinavir
  • Mitotane
  • Nefazodone
  • Nelfinavir
  • Nilotinib
  • Piperaquine
  • Posaconazole
  • Primidone
  • Ritonavir
  • Saquinavir
  • Siltuximab
  • Tadalafil
  • Telaprevir
  • Telithromycin
  • Voriconazole

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acebutolol
  • Alprenolol
  • Atenolol
  • Avanafil
  • Betaxolol
  • Bevantolol
  • Bisoprolol
  • Bucindolol
  • Carteolol
  • Carvedilol
  • Celiprolol
  • Cimetidine
  • Dilevalol
  • Esmolol
  • Labetalol
  • Levobunolol
  • Mepindolol
  • Metipranolol
  • Metoprolol
  • Nadolol
  • Nebivolol
  • Oxprenolol
  • Penbutolol
  • Pindolol
  • Propranolol
  • Sildenafil
  • Sotalol
  • Talinolol
  • Tertatolol
  • Timolol
  • Vardenafil

Does food or alcohol interact with tamsulosin?

Tamsulosin may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with tamsulosin?

Tamsulosin may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Allergy to sulfa drugs—Increased allergic reaction risk in patients with this condition.
  • Hypotension (low blood pressure)—Use with caution. May make this condition worse.
  • Kidney disease, severe or
  • Liver disease, severe—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Understand the dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of tamsulosin for an adult?

Initial Dose: 0.4 mg orally once a day

Maximum Dose: 0.8 mg orally once a day

What is the dose of tamsulosin for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is tamsulosin available?

Tamsulosin is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

Capsule 0,4 mg

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

Symptoms of overdose may include:

  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • blurred vision
  • upset stomach
  • headache

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of tamsulosin, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

msBahasa Malaysia

Review Date: May 30, 2016 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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