Generic Name: Pyridoxine Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Uses

What is Pyridoxine used for?

Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) is used to prevent or treat low levels of vitamin B6 in people who do not get enough of the vitamin from their diets. Most people who eat a normal diet do not need extra vitamin B6. However, some conditions (such as alcoholism, liver disease, overactive thyroid, heart failure) or medications (such as isoniazid, cycloserine, hydralazine, penicillamine) can cause low levels of vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 plays an important role in the body. It is needed to maintain the health of nerves, skin, and red blood cells.

Pyridoxine has been used to prevent or treat a certain nerve disorder (peripheral neuropathy) caused by certain medications (such as isoniazid). It has also been used to treat certain hereditary disorders (such as xanthurenic aciduria, hyperoxaluria, homocystinuria).

How should I take Pyridoxine?

Take this vitamin by mouth with or without food, usually once daily. Follow all directions on the product package, or take as directed by your doctor. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

If you are taking the extended-release capsules, swallow them whole. Do not crush or chew extended-release capsules or tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split extended-release tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

If you are taking the powder, mix it thoroughly in the proper amount of liquid and stir well. Drink all of the liquid right away. Do not prepare a supply for future use.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Use this vitamin regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens. If you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

How do I store Pyridoxine?

Pyridoxine is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Pyridoxine in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Pyridoxine that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush Pyridoxine down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Pyridoxine?

Before taking pyridoxine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this vitamin, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history.

During pregnancy, this vitamin has been found to be safe when used in recommended doses.

This vitamin passes into breast milk and is considered to be safe during breast-feeding when used in recommended doses. Consult your doctor for more information.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this Pyridoxine during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking Pyridoxine. Pyridoxine is pregnancy risk category A according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Pyridoxine?

Pyridoxine usually has no side effects when used in recommended doses.

If your doctor has prescribed this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Pyridoxine can cause side effects when taken in large doses for a long time. Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: headache, nausea, drowsiness, numbness/tingling of arms/legs.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Pyridoxine?

Some products that may interact with this vitamin include: altretamine, cisplatin, phenytoin.

This vitamin may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including urine test for urobilinogen), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this vitamin.

Pyridoxine may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Pyridoxine?

Pyridoxine may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Pyridoxine?

Pyridoxine may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Pyridoxine.

What is the dose of Pyridoxine for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Drug Induced Vitamin/Mineral Deficiency

Drug Induced Neuritis:

Cycloserine: 100 to 300 mg/day orally in divided doses.

Isoniazid or penicillamine: 100 to 200 mg/day orally for 3 weeks or 25 to 100 mg/day for prophylaxis.

Oral contraceptives: 25 to 30 mg/day orally.

Acute Intoxication:

Hydralazine: 25 mg/kg. One-third of the dose should be administered IM and the remainder administered as an IV infusion over 3 hours.

Isoniazid: 1 to 4 grams IV as a first dose, then 1 g IM every 30 minutes until the total required dose has been administered (given with other anticonvulsants as needed). The total dose administered should equal the amount of isoniazid ingested.

Mushroom ingestion (genus Gyromitra): 25 mg/kg IV infused over 15 to 30 minutes. Repeat as needed to a maximum total daily dose of 15 to 20 g.

Usual Adult Dose for Dietary Supplement

Pyridoxine Deficiency:

10 to 25 mg/day orally, IM, or IV for 3 weeks followed by 2 to 5 mg/day from a multivitamin product.

Usual Adult Dose for Anemia

Sideroblastic, hereditary: 200 to 600 mg orally daily. If adequate response obtained, dose may be decreased to 30 to 50 mg orally daily.

If therapeutic response is not obtained after 1 to 2 months of pyridoxine therapy, a different therapy should be considered.

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting

Nausea and vomiting of Pregnancy:

25 mg orally every 8 hours.

Precautions

Drug dependence has been reported in patients withdrawn from the drug at doses of 200 mg per day.

Pyridoxine should not be administered intravenously to patients with heart disease.

Sensory neuropathy with axonal degeneration has been reported following a single large dose of pyridoxine (10 g) administered intravenously. It may rarely occur following chronic administration of lower doses.

Other Comments

Administer parenteral pyridoxine by slow IV push.

When administering large parenteral doses, the patients heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure should be monitored closely.

Oral pyridoxine may be given with or without food.

Urinary excretion of 4-pyridoxic acid <0.1 mg/24 hours is suggestive of a deficiency.

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is found in meat, liver, whole-grain breads and cereals, soybeans, vegetables, eggs, peanuts, walnuts, and corn.

Average Adequate Intake (AI) in Adults:

>=19 to 50 years: 1.3 mg/day

>=51 years:

Men: 1.7 mg/day

Women: 1.5 mg/day

What is the dose of Pyridoxine for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Drug Induced Vitamin/Mineral Deficiency

Drug Induced Neuritis (cycloserine, isoniazid, hydralazine, penicillamine) :

Treatment: 10 to 50 mg/day.

Prophylaxis: 1 to 2 mg/kg/day

Acute Intoxication:

Hydralazine: 25 mg/kg: One-third of the dose should be administered IM and the remainder administered as an IV infusion over 3 hours.

Isoniazid: Acute ingestion of known amount: Initial: A total dose of pyridoxine equal to the amount of isoniazid ingested (maximum dose: 70 mg/kg, up to 5 g); administer at a rate of 0.5 to 1 g/minute until seizures stop or the maximum initial dose has been administered; may repeat every 5 to 10 minutes as needed to control persistent seizure activity and/or CNS toxicity. If seizures stop prior to the administration of the calculated initial dose, infuse the remaining pyridoxine over 4 to 6 hours. Acute ingestion of unknown amount: Initial: 70 mg/kg (maximum dose: 5 g); administer at a rate of 0.5 to 1 g/minute; may repeat every 5 to 10 minutes as needed to control persistent seizure activity and/or CNS toxicity.

Mushroom ingestion (genus Gyromitra): 25 mg/kg IV. Repeat as needed up to a maximum total dose of 15 to 20 g.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dietary Supplement

Pyridoxine Deficiency:

5 to 25 mg/day orally, IM, or IV for 3 weeks followed by 1.5 to 2.5 mg/day from a multivitamin product.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Seizures

Pyridoxine-dependent seizures:

10 to 100 mg PO, IM, or IV initially, followed by 2 to 100 mg orally daily.

Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) in Pediatrics:

1 to 3 years: 0.5 mg/day

4 to 8 years: 0.6 mg/day

Average Adequate Intake (AI) in Pediatrics:

0 to 6 months: 0.1 mg/day

7 to 12 months: 0.3 mg/day

9 to 13 years: 1 mg/day

Males:

>=14 years: 1.3 mg/day

Female:

>=14 years: 1.2 mg/day

How is Pyridoxine available?

Pyridoxine is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Oral tablet,
  • Injectable solution,
  • Oral capsule,
  • Compounding powder.

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Pyridoxine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

 

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: April 21, 2018 | Last Modified: April 21, 2018

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