What is progesterone?

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Generic Name: Progesterone Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is progesterone used for?

Progesterone is a female hormone important for the regulation of ovulation and menstruation.

Progesterone is used to cause menstrual periods in women who have not yet reached menopause but are not having periods due to a lack of progesterone in the body. This medicine is also used to prevent overgrowth in the lining of the uterus in postmenopausal women who are receiving estrogen hormone replacement therapy.

Progesterone may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

How should I take progesterone?

Progesterone is sometimes given for only a short period of time, such as 6 to 12 days at a time during each menstrual cycle. Following your dosing schedule is very important for this medication to be effective. Try not to miss any doses.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Take the pill form of progesterone with a full glass of water.

Apply progesterone cream to the skin as directed by your doctor.

Progesterone injection is given as a shot into a muscle. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and syringes used in giving the medicine.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using progesterone.

Your doctor will need to see you on a regular basis while you are using this medication. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

How do I store progesterone?

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not freeze. Different brands of this medication may have different storage needs. Check the product package for instructions on how to store your brand, or ask your pharmacist. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using progesterone?

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Use of progesterone is not indicated in children. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of progesterone have not been performed in the geriatric population, no geriatric-specific problems have been documented to date. However, elderly patients are more likely to have breast cancer, stroke, or dementia, which may require caution in patients receiving progesterone.

Is it safe to take progesterone during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this medication during pregnancy. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking this medication. This medication is pregnancy risk category B (A=No risk, B=No risk in some studies, C=There may be some risk, D=Positive evidence of risk, X=Contraindicated, N=Unknown).

Breastfeeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of progesterone?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
  • sudden headache, confusion, pain behind the eyes, problems with vision, speech, or balance;
  • fast or pounding heartbeats;
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • unusual or unexpected vaginal bleeding;
  • migraine headache;
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;
  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;
  • a breast lump; or
  • symptoms of depression (sleep problems, weakness, mood changes).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • mild nausea, diarrhea, bloating, stomach cramps;
  • dizziness, spinning sensation;
  • hot flashes;
  • mild headache;
  • joint pain;
  • breast pain or tenderness;
  • cough;
  • acne or increased hair growth;
  • changes in weight; or
  • vaginal itching, dryness, or discharge.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with progesterone?

Progesterone may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Dabrafenib
  • Eslicarbazepine Acetate

Does food or alcohol interact with progesterone?

Progesterone may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

What health conditions may interact with progesterone?

Progesterone may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Abnormal or unusual vaginal bleeding or
  • Allergy to peanuts or peanut oil or
  • Blood clots (e.g., deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism), active or history of or
  • Breast cancer, known, suspected, or a history of or
  • Heart attack, active or history of or
  • Liver disease or
  • Stroke, active or history of—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Asthma or
  • Diabetes or
  • Edema (fluid retention or body swelling) or
  • Endometriosis or
  • Epilepsy (seizures) or
  • Heart disease or
  • Hypercalcemia (high calcium in the blood) or
  • Hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol in the blood) or
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure) or
  • Kidney disease or
  • Migraine headache or
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or
  • Thyroid problems—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.

Understand the dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Progesterone.

What is the dose of Progesterone for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Amenorrhea:

5 to 10 mg IM for six to eight consecutive days.

400 mg orally for 10 days. Give dose in the evening.

Usual Adult Dose for Uterine Bleeding:

5 to 10 mg IM daily for 6 doses.

Usual Adult Dose for Endometrial Hyperplasia — Prophylaxis:

200 mg orally for 12 consecutive days, per 28 day cycle. Give dose in the evening.

Usual Adult Dose for Progesterone Insufficiency:

Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) – Gel:

90 mg of the 8% gel, once daily intravaginally, in women who require supplementation.

90 mg of the 8% gel, twice daily intravaginally, in women with partial or complete ovarian failure who require replacement.

If pregnancy occurs, therapy with the intravaginal gel may be continued until placental autonomy is achieved, up to 10 to 12 weeks.

Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) – Vaginal Insert

100 mg administered vaginally two or three times daily starting at oocyte retrieval and continuing for up to 10 weeks total duration. Efficacy in women 35 years of age and older has not been clearly established. The appropriate dose in this age group has not been determined.

Progesterone deficiency associated with menopause and perimenopause:

progesterone 1.7% topical cream: rub 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon into the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, or other soft areas of skin once or twice daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Premature Labor:

Study (n=459) – National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) – Prevention of Recurrent Preterm Delivery in Women at High Risk: 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17P) 250 mg IM once weekly starting on the 21st week of gestation through time of delivery or week 36 of gestation.

Study (n=142) – Reduce Incidence of Spontaneous Preterm Birth in Women at Increased Risk: 100 mg vaginal suppository daily, between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation.

Usual Adult Dose for Seizures:

(Study=25) – Catamenial epilepsy [complex partial or secondary generalized motor seizures]:

200 mg lozenge three times daily administered in relation to pattern of seizure exacerbation during luteal phase of menstrual cycle. For patients with perimenstrual exacerbation, dose was provided on day 23 through day 25 of menstrual cycle. For patients with seizure exacerbation during entire luteal phase, dose was provided on day 15 through day 25 of each menstrual cycle. The desired progesterone serum level was between 5 and 25 ng/mL 4 hours after taking the lozenge. All patients continued taking their best antiseizure medication.

Usual Adult Dose for Perimenopausal Symptoms:

Progesterone deficiency associated with menopause and perimenopause:

progesterone 1.7% topical cream: Rub 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoonful into the palms of the hands, soles of feet, or other soft area once or twice daily.

What is the dose of Progesterone for a child?

Safety and effectiveness have not been established in pediatric patients (less than 18 years of age).

How is Progesterone available?

Progesterone is available in the following dosage forms and strengths: Capsules 100 mg

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Progesterone, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: May 30, 2016 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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