What is penicillin G?

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Generic Name: Penicillin G Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is penicillin g used for?

This medication is used to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections. It is also used to prevent infection of the heart (bacterial endocarditis) in patients with certain heart diseases who are having surgery. This medication is known as a natural  penicillinantibiotic. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

How should I take penicillin g?

Depending on your specific product, this medication is given by injection into a vein or into a muscle. Use exactly as directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. For children, the dosage is also based on weight.

If you are giving this medication to yourself at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.

Give aminoglycosides (such as gentamicin) separately from this medication. Do not mix together in the same IV fluid.

Antibiotics work best when the amount of medicine in your body is kept at a constant level. Therefore, use this drug at evenly spaced intervals.

Continue to use this medication until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping the medication too early may allow bacteria to continue to grow, which may result in a return of the infection.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

How do I store penicillin g?

Penicillin G is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store penicillin G in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of penicillin G that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush penicillin G down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using penicillin g?

Before administering penicillin,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to penicillin, cephalosporins [e.g., cefaclor (Ceclor), cefadroxil (Duricef), or cephalexin (Keflex)], or any other drugs.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially other antibiotics, anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin), aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as naproxen (Anaprox) or ibuprofen (Motrin), atenolol (Tenormin), diuretics (‘water pills’), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), and vitamins.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney or liver disease, allergies, asthma, blood disease, colitis, stomach problems, or hay fever.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking penicillin, call your doctor.
  • if you have diabetes and regularly check your urine for sugar, use Clinistix or TesTa Do not use Clinitest tablets because penicillin may cause false positive results.

Is it safe to take penicillin g during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

  • Pregnancy
Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.
  • Breast-feeding:

Very small amounts of penicillin G transfer into breast milk. Peak milk concentrations occur at approximately 1 hour after an IM dose and are higher if multiple doses are given. The manufacturer recommends that caution be exercised when administering penicillin to nursing women. Nondose-related effects could include modification of bowel flora and allergic sensitization.

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of penicillin g?

Pain/redness/swelling at injection site may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: joint/muscle pain, muscle weakness, swelling of ankles/feet, dark/cloudy urine, extreme tiredness, fast/slow/irregular heartbeat, new signs of infection (e.g., fever, persistent sore throat), easy bruising/bleeding, change in the amount of urine, numbness/tingling of arms/legs, seizures, uncontrolled movements, confusion.

If used to treat syphilis or other spirochetal infections (e.g., Lyme disease), this medication may cause a condition known as Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction. This condition may occur 1 to 2 hours after you receive the medication and can last up to 24 hours. Notify your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms: fever/chills, muscle pain, worsening of skin sores, fast heartbeat, fast breathing, dizziness, flushing.

This medication may rarely cause a severe intestinal condition (Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea) due to a type of resistant bacteria. This condition may occur weeks to months after treatment has stopped. Do not use anti-diarrhea products or narcotic pain medications if you have any of these symptoms because these products may make them worse. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop: persistent diarrhea, abdominal or stomach pain/cramping, blood/mucus in your stool.

Use of this medication for prolonged or repeated periods may result in oral thrush or a new vaginal yeast infection. Contact your doctor if you notice white patches in your mouth, a change in vaginal discharge, or other new symptoms.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Penicillin is a substance of low toxicity but does have a significant index of sensitization. The following hypersensitivity reactions have been reported: skin rashes ranging from maculopapular eruptions to exfoliative dermatitis;urticaria; and reactions resembling serum sickness, including chills, fever,edema, arthralgia and prostration. Severe and occasionally fatal anaphylaxishas occurred (see WARNINGS).

Hemolytic anemia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, andneuropathy are rarely observed adverse reactions and are usually associated with high intravenous dosage. Patients given continuous intravenous therapy with benzylpenicillin potassium in high dosage (10 million to 100 million units daily) may suffer severe or even fatal potassium poisoning, particularly if renal insufficiency is present. Hyperreflexia, convulsions, andcoma may be indicative of this syndrome.

Cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrest may also occur. (High dosage of penicillin G sodium may result in congestive heart failure due to high sodium intake.)

The Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction has been reported in patients treated forsyphilis.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with penicillin g?

Penicillin G may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking any of these medicines, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acrivastine
  • Aripiprazole
  • Axitinib
  • Bosutinib
  • Bupropion
  • Chlortetracycline
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clozapine
  • Cobicistat
  • Cyclosporine
  • Daclatasvir
  • Demeclocycline
  • Doxorubicin
  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Liposome
  • Doxycycline
  • Eliglustat
  • Elvitegravir
  • Enzalutamide
  • Hydrocodone
  • Ivabradine
  • Lymecycline
  • Meclocycline
  • Methacycline
  • Methotrexate
  • Minocycline
  • Nifedipine
  • Oxytetracycline
  • Piperaquine
  • Rolitetracycline
  • Simeprevir
  • Teriflunomide
  • Tetracycline
  • Vecuronium
  • Venlafaxine
  • Warfarin

Does food or alcohol interact with penicillin g?

Penicillin G may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with penicillin g?

Penicillin G may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Allergy, general (such as asthma, eczema, hay fever, hives), history of—Patients with a history of general allergies may be more likely to have a severe reaction to penicillins
  • Bleeding problems, history of—Patients with a history of bleeding problems may be more likely to have bleeding when receiving carbenicillin, piperacillin, or ticarcillin
  • Congestive heart failure (CHF)
  • High blood pressure—Large doses of carbenicillin or ticarcillin may make these conditions worse, because these medicines contain a large amount of salt
  • Cystic fibrosis—Patients with cystic fibrosis may have an increased chance of fever and skin rash when receiving piperacillin
  • Kidney disease—Patients with kidney disease may have an increased chance of side effects
  • Mononucleosis (”mono”)—Patients with mononucleosis may have an increased chance of skin rash when receiving ampicillin, bacampicillin, or pivampicillin
  • Phenylketonuria—Some strengths of the amoxicillin chewable tablets contain aspartame, which is changed by the body to phenylalanine, a substance that is harmful to patients with phenylketonuria.
  • Stomach or intestinal disease, history of (especially colitis, including colitis caused by antibiotics)—Patients with a history of stomach or intestinal disease may be more likely to develop colitis while taking penicillin.

Understand the dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of penicillin G for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Actinomycosis

Cervicofacial: Aqueous penicillin G 1 to 6 million units IV per day
Thoracic and abdominal: Aqueous penicillin G 10 to 20 million units IV per day

Duration: 4 to 6 weeks, followed by oral therapy for 6 to 12 months depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis

If penicillin-susceptible: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 4 million units IV every 4 hours plus 1 or 2 additional antibiotics with activity against the causative organism

The additional drugs may include ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, rifampin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, imipenem, clindamycin, and macrolides.

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis

If penicillin-susceptible: Aqueous penicillin G 4 million units IV every 4 to 6 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Aspiration Pneumonia

Aqueous penicillin G 2 to 3 million units IV every 4 to 6 hours plus metronidazole 500 mg IV every 8 hours for 7 to 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Clostridial Infection

Wound botulism: Aqueous penicillin G 3 to 4 million units IV every 4 hours for 7 to 14 days, as an adjunct to debridement; once the patient improves, penicillin V potassium 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Deep Neck Infection

Penicillin G 2 to 4 million units IV or IM every 4 to 6 hours for 2 to 3 weeks, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

The addition of metronidazole to high-dose penicillin therapy is recommended by many experts to treat parapharyngeal infections because of the increasing frequency of penicillin-resistant anaerobes. Removal of abscessed material is also necessary for successful treatment.

Usual Adult Dose for Diphtheria

As an adjunct to antitoxin to prevent carrier state: Aqueous penicillin G 2 to 3 million units IV per day in divided doses every 4 to 6 hours for 10 to 12 days

Usual Adult Dose for Endocarditis

Patients with normal renal function:
Native valve infections due to highly penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus viridans and S bovis (MIC less than or equal to 0.12 mcg/mL): Aqueous penicillin G 12 to 18 million units/day IV continuously or in 4 or 6 divided doses for 4 weeks; may add gentamicin 3 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for 2 weeks

Native valve infections due to relatively resistant strains of S viridans and S bovis (MIC greater than 0.12 mcg/mL and less than 0.5 mcg/mL): Aqueous penicillin G 24 million units/day IV continuously or in 4 to 6 divided doses for 4 weeks plus gentamicin 3 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for 2 weeks

Prosthetic valve infections due to penicillin-susceptible S viridans and S bovis (less than or equal to 0.12 mcg/mL): Aqueous penicillin G 24 million units/day IV continuously or in 4 to 6 divided doses for 6 weeks with or without gentamicin 3 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for 2 weeks

Prosthetic valve infections due to relatively or fully resistant S viridans and S bovis (MIC greater than 0.12 mcg/mL): Aqueous penicillin G 24 million units/day IV continuously or in 4 to 6 divided doses for 6 weeks plus gentamicin 3 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for 6 weeks

Native valve or prosthetic valve infections due to susceptible enterococci: Aqueous penicillin G sodium 18 to 30 million units/day IV continuously or in 6 divided doses, plus gentamicin 3 mg/kg IM or IV every 24 hours or streptomycin 7.5 mg/kg IV or IM (if gentamicin resistant) every 12 hours for 4 to 6 weeks

Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae: Aqueous penicillin G 12 to 20 million units/day IV continuously or in divided doses every 4 to 6 hours for 4 to 6 weeks

Listeria monocytogenes: Aqueous penicillin G 15 to 20 million units/day IV in divided doses every 4 to 6 hours for 4 weeks

Refer to current published guidelines for detailed recommendations.

Usual Adult Dose for Fusospirochetosis

Aqueous penicillin G 5 to 10 million units IV per day in 4 to 6 divided doses

Usual Adult Dose for Joint Infection

Aqueous penicillin G 2 to 3 million units IV every 4 hours for 2 weeks, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Leptospirosis

Aqueous benzylpenicillin 1.5 million units IV every 6 hours for 7 days

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease – Arthritis

Recurrent arthritis after oral treatment: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 3 to 4 million units IV every 4 hours (18 to 24 million units/day)
Duration: 14 to 28 days

Ceftriaxone is considered the parenteral drug of choice.

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease – Carditis

Third-degree heart block: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 3 to 4 million units IV every 4 hours (18 to 24 million units/day), with cardiac monitoring and a temporary pacemaker for complete heart block
Duration: 14 to 21 days

Ceftriaxone is considered the parenteral drug of choice.

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease – Erythema Chronicum Migrans

250 to 500 mg orally every 6 hours for 14 to 21 days

Amoxicillin and doxycycline are considered the oral drugs of choice.

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease – Neurologic

Meningitis, radiculopathy, or late-Lyme CNS or peripheral nerve disease: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 3 to 4 million units IV every 4 hours (18 to 24 million units/day)
Duration: 14 to 28 days

Ceftriaxone is considered the parenteral drug of choice.

Usual Adult Dose for Meningitis

Listerial meningitis: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 15 to 20 million units/day IV administered in equally divided doses every 4 to 6 hours for 2 weeks
Pasteurella meningitis: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 1 million units IV every 4 to 6 hours for 2 weeks

Usual Adult Dose for Meningitis – Meningococcal

Aqueous benzylpenicillin 6 million units IV every 4 hours or 24 million units/day continuous IV infusion for 14 days or until afebrile for 7 days

If meningococcal meningitis is suspected, immediate treatment with penicillin is required, and should be started before lumbar puncture confirmation of the diagnosis. The mortality of this disease is 50% within the first 24 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Meningitis – Pneumococcal

Penicillin-sensitive (MIC less than 0.1 mcg/mL): Aqueous benzylpenicillin 4 million units IV every 4 hours for 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Otitis Media

Streptococcal: Penicillin V potassium 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 hours for 2 weeks

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia

Penicillin-susceptible pneumococci: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 1 to 2 million units IV every 4 hours for 7 to 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Mild to moderate infection: Penicillin V potassium 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease

Aqueous benzylpenicillin 5 million units IV as a loading dose, followed by 2.5 million units every 4 hours until delivery

Usual Adult Dose for Rat-bite Fever

Mild infection: Penicillin V potassium 500 mg orally every 6 hours
Moderate to severe infection: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 3 to 5 million units IV every 6 hours (12 to 20 million units/day)

Duration: 10 to 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatic Fever Prophylaxis

Penicillin G benzathine: 1.2 million units IM every 3 to 4 weeks
Penicillin V potassium: 250 mg orally twice daily

For high-risk patients, penicillin G benzathine given every 3 weeks may be more effective and is recommended. Oral penicillin can be used for prevention in lower risk patients whose compliance can be ensured.

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection

Streptococcal cellulitis: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 1 to 2 million units IV every 6 hours for 7 to 10 days
Prevention of recurrent erysipelas (Milroy disease): Penicillin G benzathine 1.2 million units IM every 4 weeks

Usual Adult Dose for Syphilis – Early

Primary, secondary: Penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units IM once

All patients should undergo clinical and serological testing every 6 months for 2 to 3 years.

Usual Adult Dose for Syphilis – Latent

Early latent: Penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units IM once
Late latent or unknown duration: Penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units IM once a week for 3 weeks (total dose 7.2 million units)

All patients should undergo clinical and serological testing every 6 months for 2 to 3 years.

Usual Adult Dose for Neurosyphilis

Aqueous benzylpenicillin 3 to 4 million units IV every 4 hours or 18 to 24 million units per day as a continuous infusion for 10 to 14 days; may follow with penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units IM once a week for up to 3 weeks

All patients should undergo clinical and serological testing every 6 months for 2 to 3 years.

Usual Adult Dose for Tertiary Syphilis

Penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units IM once a week for 3 weeks

All patients should undergo clinical and serological testing every 6 months for 2 to 3 years.

Usual Adult Dose for Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis

Streptococcal pharyngitis: Penicillin V potassium 500 mg orally every 6 hours for 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

Mild streptococcal infection: Penicillin V potassium 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours for 10 days
Pneumococcal empyema: Benzylpenicillin 5 to 24 million units/day IV in divided doses every 4 to 6 hours

 

What is the dose of benzylpenicillin for a child?

 

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Infection

Aqueous benzylpenicillin:
Neonates:
0 to 4 weeks, birthweight less than 1200 g: 25,000 to 50,000 units/kg IV or IM every 12 hours
Less than 1 week, birthweight 1200 to 2000 g: 25,000 to 50,000 units/kg IV or IM every 12 hours
Less than 1 week, birthweight greater than 2000 g: 25,000 to 50,000 units/kg IV or IM every 8 hours
1 to 4 weeks, birthweight 1200 to 2000 g: 25,000 to 50,000 units/kg IV or IM every 8 hours
1 to 4 weeks, birthweight greater than 2000 g: 25,000 to 50,000 units/kg IV or IM every 6 hours

Greater than 1 month:
Mild to moderate infections: 6250 to 12,500 units/kg IV or IM every 6 hours
Severe infections: 250,000 to 400,000 units/kg per day IV or IM in 4 to 6 divided doses

Maximum dose: 24 million units

Penicillin G benzathine:
Mild to moderate infections:
1 month or older, less than 27 kg: 300,000 to 600,000 units IM once
1 month or older, 27 kg or more: 900,000 to 1,200,000 units IM once

Penicillin V potassium:
Mild to moderate infections:
Greater than 1 month to less than 12 years: 25 to 50 mg/kg per day orally in divided doses every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum dose: 3 g/day

12 years or older: 125 to 500 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours

Usual Pediatric Dose for Endocarditis

Patients with normal renal function (dosage should not exceed adult dose):
Native valve infections due to highly penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus viridans and S bovis (MIC less than or equal to 0.12 mcg/mL): Aqueous benzylpenicillin 200,000 units/kg/day IV in 4 or 6 divided doses for 4 weeks; may add gentamicin 1 mg/kg IM or IV every 8 hours or 3 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for 2 weeks

Native valve infections due to relatively resistant strains of S viridans and S bovis (MIC greater than 0.12 mcg/mL and less than 0.5 mcg/mL): Aqueous benzylpenicillin 300,000 units/day IV in 4 to 6 divided doses for 4 weeks plus gentamicin 1 mg/kg IM or IV every 8 hours or 3 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for 2 weeks

Prosthetic valve infections due to penicillin-susceptible S viridans and S bovis (less than or equal to 0.12 mcg/mL): Aqueous benzylpenicillin 300,000 units/day IV in 4 to 6 divided doses for 6 weeks with or without gentamicin 1 mg/kg IM or IV every 8 hours or 3 mg/kg IV every 24 hours for 2 weeks

Prosthetic valve infections due to relatively or fully resistant S viridans and S bovis (MIC greater than 0.12 mcg/mL): Aqueous benzylpenicillin 300,000 units/day IV in 4 to 6 divided doses for 6 weeks plus gentamicin 1 mg/kg IM or IV every 8 hours for 6 weeks

Native valve or prosthetic valve infections due to susceptible enterococci: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 300,000 units/day IV in 4 to 6 divided doses, plus gentamicin 1 mg/kg IM or IV every 8 hours or streptomycin 10 to 15 mg/kg IV or IM (if gentamicin resistant) every 12 hours for 4 to 6 weeks

Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 12 to 20 million units/day IV continuously or in divided doses every 4 to 6 hours for 4 to 6 weeks

Listeria monocytogenes: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 15 to 20 million units/day IV in divided doses every 4 to 6 hours for 4 weeks

Refer to current published guidelines for detailed recommendations.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Lyme Disease – Arthritis

Recurrent arthritis after oral treatment: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 50,000 to 100,000 units/kg IV every 4 hours
Maximum dose: 24 million units/day

Duration: 14 to 28 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Lyme Disease – Carditis

Third-degree heart block: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 50,000 to 100,000 units/kg IV every 4 hours, with cardiac monitoring and a temporary pacemaker for complete heart block
Maximum dose: 24 million units/day

Duration: 14 to 21 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Lyme Disease – Neurologic

Meningitis, radiculopathy, or late-Lyme CNS or peripheral nerve disease: Aqueous benzylpenicillin 50,000 to 100,000 units/kg IV every 4 hours
Maximum dose: 24 million units/day

Duration: 14 to 28 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Rheumatic Fever Prophylaxis

Penicillin G benzathine 25,000 to 50,000 units/kg IM once every 3 to 4 weeks
Maximum dose: 1.2 million units/dose

Usual Pediatric Dose for Congenital Syphilis

Aqueous benzylpenicillin:
Less than 1 month (symptomatic infants and asymptomatic infants with abnormal CSF): 50,000 units/kg IV every 12 hours during the first 7 days of life and every 8 hours thereafter for 10 days

Greater than 1 month: 50,000 units/kg IV every 4 to 6 hours for 10 days

Penicillin G benzathine:
Asymptomatic neonates weighing greater than 1200 g: 50,000 units/kg IM one time

Infants and children: 50,000 units/kg IM once a week for 3 weeks
Maximum dose: 2.4 million units/dose

Usual Pediatric Dose for Syphilis – Early

Greater than 1 month: Penicillin G benzathine 50,000 units/kg IM once
Maximum dose: 2.4 million units/dose

Usual Pediatric Dose for Syphilis – Latent

Penicillin G benzathine:
Early latent: 50,000 units/kg IM once
Late latent or unknown duration: 50,000 units/kg IM once a week for 3 weeks

Maximum dose: 2.4 million units/dose

How is benzylpenicillin available?

Benzylpenicillin is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

Solution, Intravenous, as potassium:

Generic: 20,000 units/mL (50 mL); 40,000 units/mL (50 mL); 60,000 units/mL (50 mL)

Solution Reconstituted, Injection:

Pfizerpen-G: 5,000,000 units (1 ea)

Solution Reconstituted, Injection, as potassium:

Pfizerpen-G: 5,000,000 units (1 ea), 20,000,000 units (1 ea)

Pfizerpen-G: 5,000,000 units (1 ea) , 20,000,000 units (1 ea) [pyrogen free]

Generic: 5,000,000 units (1 ea), 20,000,000 units (1 ea)

Solution Reconstituted, Injection, as sodium:

Generic: 5,000,000 units ( 1 ea)

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of benzylpenicillin, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: May 30, 2016 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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