Nisoldipine

By

Generic Name: Nisoldipine Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Uses

What is Nisoldipine used for?

Nisoldipine is used with or without other medications to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems. Nisoldipine is called a calcium channel blocker. It works by relaxing blood vessels so blood can flow more easily.

How should I take Nisoldipine?

Take this medication by mouth, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor. Take this medication on an empty stomach or with a low-fat meal. Do not take within 1 hour before or 2 hours after a high-fat meal. Doing so may increase side effects.

Do not crush or chew this medication. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

This medication comes in different sustained-action forms with different strengths. Check with your doctor or pharmacist that you are taking the correct dose and form. Do not take a different strength or form without checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.

Avoid eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while using this medication unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Grapefruit can increase the amount of certain medications in your bloodstream. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Your doctor may gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day. It is important to continue taking this medication even if you feel well. Most people with high blood pressure do not feel sick.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens (for example, your routine blood pressure readings remain high or increase).

How do I store Nisoldipine?

Nisoldipine is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Nisoldipine in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Nisoldipine that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush Nisoldipine down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Nisoldipine?

Before taking nisoldipine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (such as amlodipine, nifedipine); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: a certain structural heart problem (aortic stenosis), liver disease.

This drug may make you dizzy. Alcohol or marijuana can make you more dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is not known if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this Nisoldipine during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking Nisoldipine. Nisoldipine is pregnancy risk category N according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Nisoldipine?

Dizziness, swelling ankles/feet, flushing, or headache may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To reduce dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

An empty tablet shell may appear in your stool. This effect is harmless because your body has already absorbed the medication.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: fast/irregular/pounding heartbeat, fainting, vision changes.

Some people who already have severe heart disease may rarely develop worsening chest pain or a heart attack after starting this medication or increasing the dose. Get medical help right away if you experience: worsening chest pain, symptoms of a heart attack (such as chest/jaw/left arm pain, shortness of breath, unusual sweating).

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Nisoldipine?

Other medications can affect the removal of nisoldipine from your body, which may affect how nisoldipine works. Examples include cimetidine, azole antifungals (such as itraconazole, ketoconazole), macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin), rifamycins (such as rifabutin), St. John’s wort, drugs used to treat seizures (such as carbamazepine, phenytoin), among others.

Some products have ingredients that could raise your heart rate or blood pressure. Tell your pharmacist what products you are using, and ask how to use them safely (especially cough-and-cold products, diet aids, or NSAIDs such as ibuprofen/naproxen).

Nisoldipine may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Nisoldipine?

Nisoldipine may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Nisoldipine?

Nisoldipine may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Nisoldipine.

What is the dose of Nisoldipine for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension

Slow release (old formulation):

-Initial dose: 20 mg orally once a day

-Maintenance dose: 10 to 60 mg orally once a day

-Maximum dose: 60 mg/day

Controlled release (new formulation):

-Initial dose: 17 mg orally once a day

-Maintenance dose: 8.5 to 34 mg orally once a day

-Maximum dose: 34 mg/day

Comment: This drug has been used with diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and beta blockers.

Use: Alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of hypertension

Usual Geriatric Dose for Hypertension

Slow release (old formulation):

-Initial dose: 10 mg orally once a day

-Maintenance dose: 10 to 60 mg orally once a day

-Maximum dose: 60 mg/day

Controlled release (new formulation):

-Initial dose: 8.5 mg orally once a day

-Maintenance dose: 8.5 to 34 mg orally once a day

-Maximum dose: 34 mg/day

Comments:

-Dosing should be performed with caution.

-This drug has been used with diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and beta blockers.

-Blood pressure should be closely monitored during dose adjustments.

Use: Alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of hypertension

Renal Dose Adjustments

Mild to moderate renal dysfunction: No adjustment recommended.

Severe renal dysfunction: Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Patients with liver dysfunction:

Slow release (old formulation):

-Initial dose: 10 mg orally once a day

-Maintenance dose: 10 to 60 mg orally once a day

-Maximum dose: 60 mg/day

Controlled release (new formulation):

-Initial dose: 8.5 mg orally once a day

-Maintenance dose: 8.5 to 34 mg orally once a day

-Maximum dose: 34 mg/day

Comments:

-This drug has been used with diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and beta blockers.

-Blood pressure should be closely monitored during dose adjustments.

Use: Alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of hypertension

Severe liver dysfunction: Use with caution.

Patients with cirrhosis: Lower initial and maintenance doses should be used.

Other Comments

Administration advice:

-Patients should swallow the tablets whole once a day; crushing, dividing, or biting the tablets should be avoided.

-This drug should be taken 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

-Grapefruit products should be avoided before and after dosing.

Storage requirements:

-Protect from light and moisture.

General:

-Slow release (old formulation) blood pressure response increases over the 10 to 60 mg daily dose range but, adverse event rates also increase.

-Controlled release (new formulation) blood pressure response increases over the 8.5 to 34 mg daily dose range, but adverse event rates also increase.

Monitoring:

-Cardiovascular: Blood pressure, heart rate, and signs/symptoms of angina, especially during initiation and titration

Patient advice:

-Patients should be told to swallow the tablets whole; chewing, crushing, or splitting tablets should be avoided.

-Patients should be instructed to take this drug 1 hour before or 2 hours after food. Grapefruit juice should be avoided during treatment.

-Advise patients to speak to their healthcare provider if they become pregnant, intend to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

What is the dose of Nisoldipine for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is Nisoldipine available?

Nisoldipine is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Oral tablet, extended release

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Nisoldipine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Review Date: April 5, 2018 | Last Modified: April 5, 2018

You might also like