Generic Name: Moxifloxacin Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Uses

What is Moxifloxacin used for?

Moxifloxacin is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. This medication belongs to a class of drugs called quinolone antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

This antibiotic treats only bacterial infections. It will not work for virus infections (such as common cold, flu). Unnecessary use or overuse of any antibiotic can lead to its decreased effectiveness.

How should I take Moxifloxacin?

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once daily. The dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this drug unless your doctor tells you otherwise.

Take this medication at least 4 hours before or 8 hours after taking other products that may bind to it, decreasing its effectiveness. Ask your pharmacist about the other products you take. Some examples include: quinapril, sucralfate, vitamins/minerals (including iron and zinc supplements), and products containing magnesium, aluminum, or calcium (such as antacids, didanosine solution, calcium supplements).

For the best effect, take this antibiotic at evenly spaced times. To help you remember, take this medication at the same time(s) every day.

Continue to take this medication until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping the medication too early may result in a return of the infection.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

How do I store Moxifloxacin?

Moxifloxacin is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Moxifloxacin in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Moxifloxacin that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush Moxifloxacin down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Moxifloxacin?

Before taking moxifloxacin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other quinolone antibiotics (such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: diabetes, heart problems (such as recent heart attack), joint/tendon problems (such as tendonitis, bursitis), liver disease, mental/mood disorders (such as depression), myasthenia gravis, nerve problems (such as peripheral neuropathy), seizure disorder, conditions that increase your risk of seizures (such as brain/head injury, brain tumors, cerebral atherosclerosis).

Moxifloxacin may cause a condition that affects the heart rhythm (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms (such as severe dizziness, fainting) that need medical attention right away.

The risk of QT prolongation may be increased if you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that may cause QT prolongation. Before using moxifloxacin, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take and if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), family history of certain heart problems (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).

Low levels of potassium or magnesium in the blood may also increase your risk of QT prolongation. This risk may increase if you use certain drugs (such as diuretics/”water pills”) or if you have conditions such as severe sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. Talk to your doctor about using moxifloxacin safely.

This medication may rarely cause serious changes in blood sugar, especially if you have diabetes. Check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. Watch for symptoms of high blood sugar, such as increased thirst/urination. Also watch for symptoms of low blood sugar such as sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. It is a good habit to carry glucose tablets or gel to treat low blood sugar. If you don’t have these reliable forms of glucose, rapidly raise your blood sugar by eating a quick source of sugar such as table sugar, honey, or candy, or by drinking fruit juice or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor right away about the reaction and the use of this product. To help prevent low blood sugar, eat meals on a regular schedule, and do not skip meals. Your doctor may need to switch you to another antibiotic or adjust your diabetes medications if any reaction occurs.

This drug may make you dizzy. Alcohol or marijuana can make you more dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana.

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Limit your time in the sun. Avoid tanning booths and sunlamps. Use sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors. Tell your doctor right away if you get sunburned or have skin blisters/redness.

Moxifloxacin may cause live bacterial vaccines (such as typhoid vaccine) to not work as well. Do not have any immunizations/vaccinations while using this medication unless your doctor tells you to.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Children may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially joint/tendon problems.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, such as tendon problems (especially if they are also taking corticosteroids such as prednisone or hydrocortisone) and QT prolongation (see above).

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this Moxifloxacin during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking Moxifloxacin. Moxifloxacin is pregnancy risk category C according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Moxifloxacin?

Nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, lightheadedness, headache, weakness, or trouble sleeping may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: unusual bruising/bleeding, signs of a new infection (such as new/persistent fever, persistent sore throat), signs of kidney problems (such as change in the amount of urine), signs of liver problems (such as unusual tiredness, stomach/abdominal pain, persistent nausea/vomiting, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: severe dizziness, fainting, fast/irregular heartbeat.

This medication may rarely cause a severe intestinal condition (Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea) due to a type of resistant bacteria. This condition may occur during treatment or weeks to months after treatment has stopped. Tell your doctor right away if you develop: persistent diarrhea, abdominal or stomach pain/cramping, blood/mucus in your stool.

Do not use anti-diarrhea products or narcotic pain medications if you have any of these symptoms because these products may make them worse.

Use of this medication for prolonged or repeated periods may result in oral thrush or a new yeast infection. Contact your doctor if you notice white patches in your mouth, a change in vaginal discharge, or other new symptoms.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Moxifloxacin?

Some products that may interact with this drug include: “blood thinners” (such as acenocoumarol, warfarin), strontium.

Many drugs besides moxifloxacin may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, ziprasidone, among others.

Although most antibiotics are unlikely to affect hormonal birth control such as pills, patch, or ring, a few antibiotics (such as rifampin, rifabutin) can decrease their effectiveness. This could result in pregnancy. If you use hormonal birth control, ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Moxifloxacin may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Moxifloxacin?

Moxifloxacin may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Moxifloxacin?

Moxifloxacin may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Moxifloxacin.

What is the dose of Moxifloxacin for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 7 to 14 days

Comments:

-Multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MDRSP) isolates are isolates resistant to at least 2 of the following antibacterials: penicillin (MIC at least 2 mcg/mL), second-generation cephalosporins (e.g., cefuroxime), macrolides, tetracyclines, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim.

Use: For the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia due to susceptible isolates of S pneumoniae (including MDRSP), Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, or Chlamydophila pneumoniae

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of therapy:

-Complicated infections: 7 to 21 days

-Uncomplicated infections: 7 days

Uses: For the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections due to susceptible isolates of methicillin-susceptible S aureus, Escherichia coli, K pneumoniae, or Enterobacter cloacae; for the treatment of uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections due to susceptible isolates of methicillin-susceptible S aureus or S pyogenes

Usual Adult Dose for Skin and Structure Infection

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of therapy:

-Complicated infections: 7 to 21 days

-Uncomplicated infections: 7 days

Uses: For the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections due to susceptible isolates of methicillin-susceptible S aureus, Escherichia coli, K pneumoniae, or Enterobacter cloacae; for the treatment of uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections due to susceptible isolates of methicillin-susceptible S aureus or S pyogenes

Usual Adult Dose for Intraabdominal Infection

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 5 to 14 days

Use: For the treatment of complicated intraabdominal infections including polymicrobial infections (such as abscess) due to susceptible isolates of E coli, Bacteroides fragilis, S anginosus, S constellatus, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Clostridium perfringens, B thetaiotaomicron, or Peptostreptococcus species

Usual Adult Dose for Plague

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 to 14 days

Comments:

-Therapy should be started as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to Yersinia pestis.

-Efficacy studies not conducted in humans with plague for ethical and feasibility reasons; indication based on efficacy study in animals only.

Uses: For the treatment of plague (including pneumonic and septicemic plague) due to susceptible isolates of Y pestis; for the prophylaxis of plague

Usual Adult Dose for Plague Prophylaxis

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 to 14 days

Comments:

-Therapy should be started as soon as possible after suspected/confirmed exposure to Yersinia pestis.

-Efficacy studies not conducted in humans with plague for ethical and feasibility reasons; indication based on efficacy study in animals only.

Uses: For the treatment of plague (including pneumonic and septicemic plague) due to susceptible isolates of Y pestis; for the prophylaxis of plague

Usual Adult Dose for Sinusitis

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 10 days

Comments:

-Since fluoroquinolones (including this drug) have been associated with serious side effects and acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) is self-limiting for some patients, this drug should be saved for treatment of ABS in patients with no alternative treatment options.

Use: For the treatment of ABS due to susceptible isolates of S pneumoniae, H influenzae, or M catarrhalis

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis

400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours for 5 days

Comments:

-Since fluoroquinolones (including this drug) have been associated with serious side effects and acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB) is self-limiting for some patients, this drug should be saved for treatment of ABECB in patients with no alternative treatment options.

Use: For the treatment of ABECB due to susceptible isolates of S pneumoniae, H influenzae, H parainfluenzae, K pneumoniae, methicillin-susceptible S aureus, or M catarrhalis

Usual Adult Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis

US CDC recommendations: 400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: At least 2 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients exposed to aerosolized spores will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: 60 days

-Naturally acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Comments:

-Ciprofloxacin is preferred for pregnant women.

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis and as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended as a preferred oral drug for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility is unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax; the addition of a bactericidal beta-lactam is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis; inhalation, injection, and gastrointestinal anthrax; and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis

US CDC recommendations: 400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: At least 2 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients exposed to aerosolized spores will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: 60 days

-Naturally acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Comments:

-Ciprofloxacin is preferred for pregnant women.

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis and as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended as a preferred oral drug for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility is unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax; the addition of a bactericidal beta-lactam is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis; inhalation, injection, and gastrointestinal anthrax; and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis

US CDC recommendations: 400 mg orally or IV every 24 hours

Duration of Therapy:

Postexposure prophylaxis for B anthracis infection: 60 days

Systemic anthrax:

-With possible/confirmed meningitis: At least 2 to 3 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-When meningitis has been excluded: At least 2 weeks or until patient is clinically stable (whichever is longer)

-Patients exposed to aerosolized spores will require prophylaxis to complete an antimicrobial regimen of 60 days from onset of illness.

Cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement:

-Bioterrorism-related cases: 60 days

-Naturally acquired cases: 7 to 10 days

Comments:

-Ciprofloxacin is preferred for pregnant women.

-Recommended as an alternative oral drug for postexposure prophylaxis and as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic anthrax

-Recommended as a preferred oral drug for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for all strains (regardless of penicillin susceptibility or if susceptibility is unknown) when used for postexposure prophylaxis, systemic anthrax when meningitis has been excluded, or cutaneous anthrax without systemic involvement

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor when used for systemic anthrax; the addition of a bactericidal beta-lactam is recommended with possible/confirmed meningitis.

-Systemic anthrax includes anthrax meningitis; inhalation, injection, and gastrointestinal anthrax; and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Tuberculosis – Active

US CDC, Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and American Thoracic Society recommendations: 400 mg orally or IV once a day

Comments:

-Recommended as a second-line drug

-Optimal duration of therapy has not been established.

-The WHO recommends susceptibility testing and a tailored regimen using second-line drugs based on test results, if testing and second-line drugs are available.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Adult Dose for Surgical Prophylaxis

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), IDSA, Surgical Infection Society (SIS), and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) recommendations:

-Preoperative dose: 400 mg orally or IV once, starting within 120 minutes before surgical incision

Comments:

-Recommended as part of an alternative regimen for surgical prophylaxis for hysterectomy (vaginal or abdominal); coadministration with other agents is recommended.

-A single prophylactic dose is usually sufficient; if prophylaxis is continued postoperatively, duration should be less than 24 hours.

-Before use, local susceptibility should be reviewed due to increasing resistance of E coli to fluoroquinolones.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Renal Dose Adjustments

No adjustment recommended.

Liver Dose Adjustments

No adjustment recommended; caution recommended.

Dialysis

Hemodialysis and CAPD: No adjustment recommended.

Other Comments

Administration advice:

-Administer via IV infusion only; do not administer via IM, intraarterial, intrathecal, intraperitoneal, or subcutaneous injection.

-Administer IV doses over at least 60 minutes by direct infusion or through Y-type IV infusion set; avoid rapid or bolus IV infusion.

-May administer oral doses without regard to meals

-May switch from IV to oral therapy when clinically indicated at the physician’s discretion; no dose adjustment needed.

-If same IV line or Y-type line used for sequential infusion of other drugs, or if “piggyback” method is used, flush the line before and after infusion of this drug with an infusion solution compatible to all drugs administered via the common line.

-Administer oral doses at least 4 hours before or 8 hours after iron-, zinc-, aluminum-, or magnesium-containing products (e.g., antacids, sucralfate, mineral supplements/multivitamins, buffered didanosine).

Storage requirements:

-Store at 20C to 25C (68C to 77F), excursions permitted to 15C to 30C (59F to 86F).

-IV solution: Do not refrigerate (product will precipitate).

-Oral tablets: Avoid high humidity.

Reconstitution/preparation techniques:

-The manufacturer product information should be consulted.

IV compatibility:

-Compatible IV solutions (at ratios from 1:10 to 10:1): Sterile Water for Injection, USP; 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP; 1 Molar Sodium Chloride Injection; 10% Dextrose for Injection, USP; 5% Dextrose Injection, USP; Lactated Ringers for Injection

-Limited data regarding compatibility with other IV products; additives or other drugs should not be added to this drug or infused concurrently through the same IV line.

General:

-Culture and susceptibility information should be considered when selecting/modifying antibacterial therapy or, if no data are available, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may be considered when selecting empiric therapy.

-IV solution recommended when route is beneficial to patient (e.g., oral dosing is not tolerated).

-The Avelox(R) Injection and Moxifloxacin Injection contain about 34.2 and 52.5 mEq (787 and 1207 mg) of sodium in 250 mL, respectively.

Monitoring:

-Cardiovascular: ECG in patients with liver cirrhosis

-Metabolic: Blood glucose in diabetic patients

Patient advice:

-Read the US FDA-approved Medication Guide.

-Drink plenty of fluids.

-Avoid missing doses and complete the entire course of therapy.

-Stop this drug immediately and contact healthcare provider if a serious side effect occurs.

-Stop this drug and contact healthcare provider if tendon pain, swelling, or inflammation develops or you have weakness or are unable to use 1 of your joints; rest and do not exercise.

-Stop this drug at once and contact physician if symptoms of peripheral neuropathy develop.

-Contact physician if persistent headache (with or without blurred vision), any symptoms of muscle weakness (including respiratory problems) or QT interval prolongation (including prolonged heart palpitations, loss of consciousness), signs/symptoms of liver injury, or watery and bloody stools occur.

-Stop this drug at first sign of skin rash, hives or other skin reactions, rapid heartbeat, problems swallowing or breathing, swelling suggestive of angioedema, or other symptoms of allergic reaction occur.

-Do not drive, operate machinery, or engage in other tasks that require mental alertness or coordination until you know how the drug affects you.

-Avoid or minimize exposure to natural or artificial sunlight during therapy; use sun protection (e.g., protective clothing, sunscreen) if sun exposure cannot be avoided. Contact physician if sunburn-like reaction or skin eruption develops.

What is the dose of Moxifloxacin for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis

American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations:

Up to 4 weeks of age:

-Gestational age 32 to 37 weeks: 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours

-Term neonate: 10 mg/kg IV every 24 hours

3 months to 11 years:

-For 3 months to less than 2 years: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

-For 2 to 5 years: 5 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

-For 6 to 11 years: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

12 years or older:

Less than 45 kg: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

-Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

At least 45 kg: 400 mg IV once a day

Duration of Therapy: At least 2 to 3 weeks, continuing until patient is clinically stable

-Patients will require prophylaxis with a different agent to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Comments:

-Dosing for neonates provided only as guidance during emergency biological weapon event (based on available text or pharmacokinetic data extrapolated from older children).

-Recommended as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic/severe anthrax (anthrax meningitis or disseminated infection and meningitis cannot be excluded)

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor plus (a bactericidal beta-lactam [all applicable patients] or a bactericidal glycopeptide [patients 3 months or older])

-Systemic/severe anthrax includes anthrax meningitis; inhalation anthrax; or injection, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis

American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations:

Up to 4 weeks of age:

-Gestational age 32 to 37 weeks: 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours

-Term neonate: 10 mg/kg IV every 24 hours

3 months to 11 years:

-For 3 months to less than 2 years: 6 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

-For 2 to 5 years: 5 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

-For 6 to 11 years: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

12 years or older:

Less than 45 kg: 4 mg/kg IV every 12 hours

-Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose

At least 45 kg: 400 mg IV once a day

Duration of Therapy: At least 2 to 3 weeks, continuing until patient is clinically stable

-Patients will require prophylaxis with a different agent to complete an antimicrobial regimen of up to 60 days from onset of illness.

Comments:

-Dosing for neonates provided only as guidance during emergency biological weapon event (based on available text or pharmacokinetic data extrapolated from older children).

-Recommended as an alternative IV drug for the treatment of systemic/severe anthrax (anthrax meningitis or disseminated infection and meningitis cannot be excluded)

-Recommended for use with a protein synthesis inhibitor plus (a bactericidal beta-lactam [all applicable patients] or a bactericidal glycopeptide [patients 3 months or older])

-Systemic/severe anthrax includes anthrax meningitis; inhalation anthrax; or injection, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous anthrax with systemic involvement, extensive edema, or lesions of the head or neck.

-Current guidelines should be consulted for additional information.

How is Moxifloxacin available?

Moxifloxacin is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Oral tablet,
  • Intravenous solution.

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Moxifloxacin, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

 

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: March 29, 2018 | Last Modified: March 29, 2018

Want to live your best life?
Get the Hello Doktor Daily newsletter for health tips, wellness updates and more.