Generic Name: Miglitol Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Uses

What is Miglitol used for?

Miglitol is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Miglitol works in your intestines to slow the breakdown and absorption of carbohydrates from foods that you eat. This effect helps lessen your blood sugar rise after a meal.

How should I take Miglitol?

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 3 times daily with the first bite of a meal. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same times each day.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not get better or if it gets worse (your blood sugar is too high or too low).

How do I store Miglitol?

Miglitol is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Miglitol in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Miglitol that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush Miglitol down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Miglitol?

Before taking miglitol, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: intestine/bowel problems (such as inflammatory bowel disease, blockage, ulcers), kidney problems.

You may experience blurred vision, dizziness, or drowsiness due to extremely low or high blood sugar. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely.

Limit alcohol while taking this medication because it can increase your risk of developing low blood sugar.

It may be harder to control your blood sugar when your body is stressed (such as due to fever, infection, injury, or surgery). Consult your doctor because this may require a change in your treatment plan, medications, or blood sugar testing.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Discuss a plan with your doctor for managing your blood sugar while pregnant. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during your pregnancy (such as diet and medications including insulin).

This drug passes into breast milk in small amounts but is unlikely to harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this Miglitol during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking Miglitol. Miglitol is pregnancy risk category B according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Miglitol?

Diarrhea, gas, or abdominal discomfort/pain may occur as your body adjusts to this medication during the first few weeks. These side effects usually lessen with time. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Miglitol does not usually cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Low blood sugar may occur if this drug is prescribed with other diabetes medications, or if you do not consume enough calories from food, or if you do unusually heavy exercise. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about whether the dose of your other diabetes medication(s) needs to be lowered.

Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Do not use table sugar or drink non-diet soda to relieve these symptoms because miglitol slows the breakdown of table sugar. Carry glucose tablets or gel with you to treat low blood sugar. If you don’t have these reliable forms of glucose, eat some honey or drink a glass of orange juice to quickly raise your blood sugar. Tell your doctor right away about the reaction and the use of this product. To help prevent low blood sugar, eat meals on a regular schedule and do not skip meals. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to find out what you should do if you miss a meal.

Symptoms of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) include thirst, increased urination, confusion, drowsiness, flushing, rapid breathing, and fruity breath odor. If these symptoms occur, tell your doctor right away. Your dosage may need to be increased or you may need other drugs.

This medication may rarely cause a serious intestinal condition (pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis). Tell your doctor right away if you develop: diarrhea that doesn’t stop, constipation, blood/mucus in stool.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Miglitol?

Some products that may interact with this drug are: charcoal products taken by mouth, digestive enzyme products (such as amylase, pancreatin), pramlintide.

Beta blocker medications (such as metoprolol, propranolol, glaucoma eye drops such as timolol) may prevent the fast/pounding heartbeat you would usually feel when your blood sugar falls too low (hypoglycemia). Other symptoms of low blood sugar, such as dizziness, hunger, or sweating, are not affected by these drugs.

Many drugs can affect your blood sugar, making it harder to control. Before you start, stop, or change any medication, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about how the medication may affect your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of high or low blood sugar. (See also Side Effects section.) Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication, exercise program, or diet.

Miglitol may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Miglitol?

Miglitol may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Miglitol?

Miglitol may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Miglitol.

What is the dose of Miglitol for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Type 2

Individualize dose based on efficacy and tolerability:

Initial dose: 25 mg orally 3 times a day

-After 4 to 8 weeks, may increase to 50 mg orally 3 times a day if needed; after 3 more months, may increase to 100 mg orally 3 times a day if needed based on glycosylated hemoglobin

Maintenance dose: 50 mg to 100 mg orally 3 times a day

Maximum dose: 100 mg orally 3 times a day

Comments:

-Take orally at the start (with first bite) of each main meal; patients should be adhering to a diabetic diet to minimize GI side effects.

-Some patients benefit from starting at 25 mg orally once a day with subsequent titration to 3 times a day to minimize GI side effects.

-If no further reduction in postprandial glucose or HbA1c is observed with titration to 100 mg three times a day, consider lowering the dose.

Use: As an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Significant renal dysfunction (CrCl less than 25 mL/min or serum creatinine greater than 2 mg/dL): Use is not recommended

Liver Dose Adjustments

No adjustment recommended

Dose Adjustments

Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects:

-If gastrointestinal symptoms persist despite following a prescribed diet, dose reduction or discontinuation may be necessary.

Hypoglycemia:

-When given in combination with sulfonylurea agents or insulin, hypoglycemia may occur, if this occurs, dose adjustment of the sulfonylurea agent or insulin will be necessary.

Other Comments

Administration advice:

-Take orally at the start of meal (with first bite)

General:

-This drug should be titrated to reduce gastrointestinal side effects; patients should be instructed regarding the importance of following a diabetic diet.

-This drug may be used as monotherapy, or in combination with other antidiabetic agents.

-Patients receiving sulfonylureas or insulin may need a dose adjustment of these agents if hypoglycemia occurs.

Monitoring:

-Glycemic control: During initiation and titration, 1-hour postprandial plasma glucose should be used to monitor therapeutic response; glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) should be measured every 3 months to assess long-term glycemic control.

Patient advice:

-Patients should understand the importance of adhering to a diabetic diet; gastrointestinal side effects are common upon treatment initiation, but should diminish with time.

-Hypoglycemia may occur, more commonly when used in combination with insulin or a sulfonylurea; patients should be instructed to treat hypoglycemia with oral glucose (dextrose) as sucrose (cane sugar) is not expected to correct hypoglycemia due to the action of this drug.

-During periods of stress such as fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, management of diabetes may change and patients should be advised to seek medical advice.

What is the dose of Miglitol for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is Miglitol available?

Miglitol is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Oral tablet

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Miglitol, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

 

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: March 29, 2018 | Last Modified: March 29, 2018

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