Generic Name: Lansoprazole Brand Name(s): .

Uses

What is Lansoprazole used for?

Lansoprazole is used to treat certain stomach and esophagus problems (such as acid reflux, ulcers). It works by decreasing the amount of acid your stomach makes. It relieves symptoms such as heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and persistent cough. This medication helps heal acid damage to the stomach and esophagus, helps prevent ulcers, and may help prevent cancer of the esophagus. Lansoprazole belongs to a class of drugs known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

How should I take Lansoprazole?

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily, before a meal. Dosage and length of treatment are based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

Handle the tablet with dry hands. Place the tablet on your tongue and let it disintegrate. This takes less than 1 minute. Swallow the remaining particles with or without water. Do not crush, chew, or break the tablet or particles.

If you have trouble swallowing the tablet, you may dissolve it in water and take the mixture by mouth through an oral syringe. Place a tablet in an oral syringe and draw up the correct amount of water for your dose (4 milliliters for a 15-milligram tablet, or 10 milliliters for a 30-milligram tablet) into the syringe. Shake the syringe gently to break apart the tablet, then swallow the liquid within 15 minutes. To make sure that you have taken the entire dose, refill the syringe with water (2 milliliters for the 15-milligram tablet, or 5 milliliters for the 30-milligram tablet), shake again, and swallow all of the liquid. Do not prepare the liquid mixture ahead of time for later use. Doing so may destroy the drug.

If you are giving this medication through a tube into the stomach (nasogastric tube), ask your health care professional for detailed instructions on how to properly mix and give it.

If needed, antacids may be taken along with this medication. If you are also taking sucralfate, take lansoprazole at least 30 minutes before sucralfate.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day. Continue to take this medication for the prescribed length of treatment even if you are feeling better.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens. The risk of side effects goes up over time. Ask your doctor how long you should take this medication.

How do I store Lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Lansoprazole in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Lansoprazole that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush Lansoprazole down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Lansoprazole?

Before taking lansoprazole, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to similar drugs (such as dexlansoprazole, omeprazole, pantoprazole); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: liver disease, lupus.

Some symptoms may actually be signs of a more serious condition. Get medical help right away if you have: heartburn with lightheadedness/sweating/dizziness, chest/jaw/arm/shoulder pain (especially with shortness of breath, unusual sweating), unexplained weight loss.

This medicine may contain aspartame. If you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to restrict your intake of aspartame (or phenylalanine), ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this drug safely.

Proton pump inhibitors (such as lansoprazole) may increase your risk for bone fractures, especially with longer use, higher doses, and in older adults. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about ways to prevent bone loss/fracture, such as by taking calcium (such as calcium citrate) and vitamin D supplements.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. However, similar drugs pass into breast milk. The effects on a nursing infant are unknown. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this Lansoprazole during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking Lansoprazole. Lansoprazole is pregnancy risk category B according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Lansoprazole?

Diarrhea, abdominal pain, or headache may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: symptoms of a low magnesium blood level (such as unusually fast/slow/irregular heartbeat, persistent muscle spasms, seizures), signs of lupus (such as rash on nose and cheeks, new or worsening joint pain).

This medication may rarely cause a severe intestinal condition (Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea) due to a type of bacteria. Do not use anti-diarrhea products or narcotic pain medications if you have any of the following symptoms because these products may make them worse. Tell your doctor right away if you develop: persistent diarrhea, abdominal or stomach pain/cramping, fever, blood/mucus in your stool.

Rarely, proton pump inhibitors (such as lansoprazole) have caused vitamin B-12 deficiency. The risk is increased if they are taken every day for a long time (3 years or longer). Tell your doctor right away if you develop symptoms of vitamin B-12 deficiency (such as unusual weakness, sore tongue, or numbness/tingling of the hands/feet).

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing, signs of kidney problems (such as change in the amount of urine).

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Lansoprazole?

A product that may interact with this drug is: methotrexate (especially high-dose treatment).

Some products need stomach acid so that the body can absorb them properly. Lansoprazole decreases stomach acid, so it may change how well these products work. Some affected products include ampicillin, atazanavir, erlotinib, nelfinavir, pazopanib, rilpivirine, certain azole antifungals (itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole), among others.

 

Lansoprazole is very similar to dexlansoprazole. Do not use medications containing dexlansoprazole while using lansoprazole.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests, possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Lansoprazole may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Lansoprazole.

What is the dose of Lansoprazole for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Erosive Esophagitis

Treatment: 30 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 8 weeks

Maintenance: 15 mg orally once a day

Comments:

-Controlled studies did not extend beyond 12 months.

-If patients are not healed after 8 weeks or erosive esophagitis recurs, treatment for another 8 weeks may be considered.

Uses:

-Short-term treatment for healing and symptom relief of all grades of erosive esophagitis

-Maintain healing of erosive esophagitis

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer

Treatment: 15 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 4 weeks

Maintenance: 15 mg orally once a day

Comment: Controlled studies did not extend beyond 12 months.

Uses:

-Short-term treatment for healing and symptom relief of active duodenal ulcers

-Maintain healing of duodenal ulcers

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis

Treatment: 15 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 4 weeks

Maintenance: 15 mg orally once a day

Comment: Controlled studies did not extend beyond 12 months.

Uses:

-Short-term treatment for healing and symptom relief of active duodenal ulcers

-Maintain healing of duodenal ulcers

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Maintenance

Treatment: 15 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 4 weeks

Maintenance: 15 mg orally once a day

Comment: Controlled studies did not extend beyond 12 months.

Uses:

-Short-term treatment for healing and symptom relief of active duodenal ulcers

-Maintain healing of duodenal ulcers

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

15 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 8 weeks

Use: Short-term treatment of heartburn and other symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer

30 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 8 weeks

Use: Short-term treatment for healing and symptom relief of active benign gastric ulcers

Usual Adult Dose for Multiple Endocrine Adenomas

Initial dose: 60 mg orally once a day

Maintenance dose: 60 to 180 mg/day

Comments:

-A daily dose higher than 120 mg should be given as divided doses.

-Dosage should be patient-specific and should continue as long as clinically necessary. Some patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) have been on treatment for longer than 4 years.

Use: Long-term treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions, including ZES

Usual Adult Dose for Systemic Mastocytosis

Initial dose: 60 mg orally once a day

Maintenance dose: 60 to 180 mg/day

Comments:

-A daily dose higher than 120 mg should be given as divided doses.

-Dosage should be patient-specific and should continue as long as clinically necessary. Some patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) have been on treatment for longer than 4 years.

Use: Long-term treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions, including ZES

Usual Adult Dose for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Initial dose: 60 mg orally once a day

Maintenance dose: 60 to 180 mg/day

Comments:

-A daily dose higher than 120 mg should be given as divided doses.

-Dosage should be patient-specific and should continue as long as clinically necessary. Some patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) have been on treatment for longer than 4 years.

Use: Long-term treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions, including ZES

Usual Adult Dose for Helicobacter pylori Infection

Triple Therapy: 30 mg orally 2 times a day, taken concomitantly with amoxicillin and clarithromycin

-Duration of therapy: 10 to 14 days

Dual Therapy: 30 mg orally 3 times a day, taken concomitantly with amoxicillin

-Duration of therapy: 14 days

Comments:

-Refer to the manufacturer product information for dosing for amoxicillin and clarithromycin.

-Eradication of Helicobacter pylori has been shown to reduce duodenal ulcer recurrence, and may result in duodenal/gastric ulcer healing without the need for continued therapy.

Uses:

-Triple therapy: Treatment of patients with H pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease (active/1 year history of a duodenal ulcer) to eradicate H pylori

-Dual therapy: Treatment of patients with H pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease (active/1 year history of a duodenal ulcer) who is either allergic/intolerant to clarithromycin or in whom resistance to clarithromycin is known/suspected

Usual Adult Dose for NSAID-Induced Gastric Ulcer

30 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 8 weeks

Comment: Studies did not extend beyond 8 weeks.

Use: Treatment of NSAID-associated gastric ulcer in patients who continue NSAID use

Usual Adult Dose for NSAID-Induced Ulcer Prophylaxis

15 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 12 weeks

Comment: Studies did not extend beyond 12 weeks.

Use: Reduce the risk of NSAID-associated gastric ulcers in patients with a history of a documented gastric ulcer who require the use of an NSAID

Renal Dose Adjustments

No adjustment recommended.

Liver Dose Adjustments

Mild to Moderate Liver Impairment: No adjustment recommended.

Severe Liver Impairment: Dose adjustments may be required; however, no specific guidelines have been suggested. Caution is recommended.

Dose Adjustments

Daily doses above 120 mg should be administered in 2 equally divided doses.

Patients receiving high-dose methotrexate: Temporary withdrawal of treatment should be considered.

Other Comments

Administration advice:

-This drug should be taken prior to eating and should not be crushed/chewed. Ideally, this drug should be taken in the morning, 30 minutes prior to breakfast.

-The oral dissolvable tablet should be placed on the tongue and allowed to disintegrate.

-The delayed-release capsule may be opened and sprinkled onto a tablespoon of applesauce, pudding, cottage cheese, yogurt, or strained pears and swallowed immediately. Do not chew or crush granules. Alternatively, it may also be emptied into a small volume (60 mL) of either apple juice, orange juice or tomato juice and swallowed immediately. Rinse glass with more juice and swallow immediately.

-This drug may be mixed with apple juice and administered via nasogastric tube.

Storage requirements:

-The manufacturer product information should be consulted.

Reconstitution/preparation techniques:

-The manufacturer product information should be consulted.

General:

-Children younger than 1 year of age did not show beneficial effects when treated for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

-Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication rates reach 90% when this drug is combined with clarithromycin and amoxicillin/metronidazole. Lower eradication rates were seen in the combination of this drug, amoxicillin, and metronidazole.

-Treatment should be given at least an hour prior to sucralfate or antacids.

-A single, 30 mg dose inhibited stimulated acid secretion by 30%; after repeated dosing over 7 days, 90% of stimulated acid secretion was inhibited.

Monitoring:

-Magnesium levels, especially in patients taking other drugs that could result in hypomagnesemia or those on long-term therapy

-Vitamin B12 levels, especially in patients on long-term therapy

-Bone fractures, especially in patients at high risk for osteoporosis-related events

Patient advice:

-If using this drug to treat H pylori, tell patients that it is important to complete the full regimen.

-Instruct patients to seek medical attention if signs/symptoms of hypersensitivity, Clostridium difficile, or systemic cutaneous lupus erythematosus occur.

-Inform patients that this drug may cause drowsiness, dizziness, vertigo, and/or visual disturbances. They should avoid driving or operating machinery until the full effects of the drug are seen.

-Advise patients to speak to their healthcare provider if they become pregnant, intend to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

What is the dose of Lansoprazole for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Erosive Esophagitis

1 to 11 years:

-Less than or equal to 30 kg: 15 mg orally once a day

-Greater than 30 kg: 30 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 12 weeks

12 to 17 years: 30 mg orally once a day

-Duration of therapy: Up to 8 weeks

17 years and older: See adult dosing.

Comment: The dose was increased (up to 30 mg 2 times a day) in some patients who remained symptomatic after at least 2 weeks of treatment.

Use: Short-term treatment for healing and symptom relief of all grades of erosive esophagitis

Precautions

Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 1 year.

How is Lansoprazole available?

Lansoprazole is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Oral delayed release capsule,
  • Oral tablet, disintegrating,
  • Intravenous powder for injection,
  • Oral granule for reconstitution,
  • Compounding powder,
  • Oral suspension.

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Lansoprazole, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

 

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: March 13, 2018 | Last Modified: March 13, 2018

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