Generic Name: Glibenclamide Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is glibenclamide used for?

Glibenclamide is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugarin people with type 2 diabetes. It may also be used with other diabetes medications. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Glibenclamide belongs to the class of drugs known as sulfonylureas. It lowers blood sugar by causing the release of your body’s natural insulin.

How should I take glibenclamide?

Glibenclamide comes in different types of tablets which provide different amounts of the medication. Do not switch between different forms or brands of this medication unless directed by your doctor.

Take glibenclamide by mouth with breakfast or the first main meal of the day as directed by your doctor, usually once daily. Some patients, especially those taking higher doses, may be directed to take this drug twice a day. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

To reduce your risk of side effects, your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully.

If you are already taking another anti-diabetic drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor’s directions carefully for stopping the old drug and starting Glibenclamide.

If you are also taking colesevelam, take Glibenclamide at least 4 hours before colesevelam.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, use it at the same time(s) each day.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens (your blood sugar levels are too high or too low).

How do I store glibenclamide?

Glibenclamide is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store glibenclamide in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of glibenclamide that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush glibenclamide down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using glibenclamide?

Before taking Glibenclamide,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Glibenclamide, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in Glibenclamide. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor if you are taking bosentan (Tracleer). Your doctor may tell you not to take Glibenclamide if you are taking this medication.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), fosinopril (Monopril), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril, (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik); anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), labetalol (Normodyne), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard), and propranolol (Inderal); calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac, others), felodipine (Plendil), isradipine (DynaCirc), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), nimodipine (Nimotop), nisoldipine (Sular), and verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan); chloramphenicol; clarithromycin (Biaxin); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); disopyramide (Norpace); diuretics (‘water pills’); fluconazole (Diflucan), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem); hormone replacement therapy and hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, implants, and injections); insulin or other medications to treat high blood sugar or diabetes; isoniazid (INH); MAO inhibitors such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), and tranylcypromine (Parnate); medications for asthma and colds; medications for mental illness and nausea; miconazole (Monistat); niacin; oral steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Deltasone); phenytoin (Dilantin); probenecid (Benemid); quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics such as cinoxacin (Cinobac), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), gatifloxacin (Tequin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), nalidixic acid (NegGram), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), trovafloxacin and alatrofloxacin combination (Trovan); rifampin; salicylate pain relievers such as choline magnesium trisalicylate, choline salicylate (Arthropan), diflunisal (Dolobid), magnesium salicylate (Doan’s, others), and salsalate (Argesic, Disalcid, Salgesic); sulfa antibiotics such as co-trimoxazole (Bactrim, Septra); sulfasalazine (Azulfidine); and thyroid medications. Also be sure to tell your doctor or pharmacist if you stop taking any medications while taking Glibenclamide. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had G6PD deficiency (an inherited condition causing premature destruction of red blood cells or hemolytic anemia); if you have hormone disorders involving the adrenal, pituitary, or thyroid gland; or if you have heart, kidney, or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking Glibenclamide, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking Glibenclamide.
  • ask your doctor about the safe use of alcoholic beverages while you are taking Glibenclamide. Alcohol can make the side effects from Glibenclamide worse. Consuming alcohol while taking Glibenclamide also rarely may cause symptoms such as flushing (reddening of the face), headache, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, weakness, blurred vision, mental confusion, sweating, choking, breathing difficulty, and anxiety.
  • plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Glibenclamide may make your skin sensitive to sunlight.
  • ask your doctor what to do if you get sick, develop an infection or fever, experience unusual stress, or are injured. These conditions can affect your blood sugar and the amount of Glibenclamide you may need.

Is it safe to take glibenclamide during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this medication during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking this medication. This medication is pregnancy risk category C according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of glibenclamide?

Stop using Glibenclamide and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • Nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • Pale skin, confusion or weakness;
  • Easy bruising or bleeding, purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin; or
  • Headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, feeling unsteady, hallucinations, fainting, seizure, shallow breathing or breathing that stops.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • Mild nausea, heartburn, feeling full;
  • Joint or muscle pain;
  • Blurred vision;
  • Mild itching or skin rash.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with glibenclamide?

Glibenclamide may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

You may be more likely to have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if you take Glibenclamide with other drugs that can lower blood sugar, such as:

  • exenatide (Byetta);
  • probenecid (Benemid);
  • aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto Bismol);
  • a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven);
  • sulfa drugs (Bactrim, SMZ-TMP, and others);
  • a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI);
  • insulin or other oral diabetes medications.

Does food or alcohol interact with glibenclamide?

Glibenclamide may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with glibenclamide?

Glibenclamide may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Alcohol intoxication;
  • Underactive adrenal glands;
  • Underactive pituitary gland;
  • Undernourished condition;
  • Weakened physical condition;
  • Any other condition that causes low blood sugar—Patients with these conditions may be more likely to develop low blood sugar while taking Glibenclamide.
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (ketones in the blood);
  • Type I diabetes—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Fever;
  • Infection;
  • Surgery;
  • Trauma—These conditions may cause temporary problems with blood sugar control and your doctor may want to treat you temporarily with insulin.
  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (an enzyme problem)—May cause hemolytic anemia (a blood disorder) in patients with this condition.
  • Heart disease—Use with caution. May make this condition worse.
  • Kidney disease;
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. Effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Understand the Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of Glibenclamide for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Type 2

Initial dose: 2.5 mg (standard) or 1.5 mg (micronized) orally once a day in the morning with breakfast.
Maintenance dose: 1.25 to 20 mg (standard) or 0.75 to 12 mg (micronized) orally in 1 or 2 divided doses.
Maximum dose: 20 mg/day (standard) or 12 mg/day (micronized).

What is the dose of Glibenclamide for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is glibenclamide available?

Glibenclamide is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

Tablet, Oral: 1.25 mg, 1.5 mg, 2.5 mg, 3 mg, 5 mg, 6 mg

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

Symptoms of overdose may include hypoglycemia symptoms as well as the following:

  • Seizures;
  • loss of consciousness.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

Before you start to take Glibenclamide, ask you doctor what you should do if you forget to take a dose. Write these directions down so that you can refer to them later.

If you miss a dose of glibenclamide, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: January 4, 2017 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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