What is gelatin?

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Generic Name: Gelatin Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is gelatin used for?

Gelatin is used for weight loss and for treating osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and brittle bones (osteoporosis). Some people also use it for strengthening bones, joints, and fingernails. Gelatin is also used for improving hair quality and to shorten recovery after exercise and sports-related injury.

How should I take gelatin?

Take gelatin as instructed by your doctor. Gelatin could be used by intravenous injection or topical.

How do I store gelatin?

Gelatin is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store gelatin in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of gelatin that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush gelatin down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using gelatin?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have:

  • liver impairment;
  • severe heart failure;
  • bleeding disorders or renal failure.

Is it safe to take gelatin during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this medication during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking this medication. This medication is pregnancy risk category C for the first 6 months, and D for the last 3 months according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of gelatin?

Most common side effects of Diclofenac are gastrointestinal disturbances including ulcer formation.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using diclofenac and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;
  • black, bloody, or tarry stools;
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • swelling or rapid weight gain, urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;
  • neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light, purple spots on the skin, and/or seizure (convulsions);
  • severe skin reaction — fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, mild heartburn or stomach pain, diarrhea, constipation bloating, gas;
  • dizziness, headache, nervousness;
  • skin itching or rash;
  • blurred vision;
  • ringing in your ears.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with gelatin?

Diclofenac may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Abciximab, Anagrelide, Apixaban, Ardeparin, Argatroban, Beta Glucan, Bivalirudin, Ceritinib, Certoparin, Cilostazol, Citalopram, Clopidogrel, Clovoxamine, Cyclosporine, Dabigatran Etexilate, Dabrafenib, Dalteparin, Danaparoid, Deferiprone, Desirudin, Dipyridamole, Duloxetine, Enoxaparin, Eptifibatide, Erlotinib, Escitalopram, Femoxetine, Feverfew, Flesinoxan, Fluoxetine, Fluvoxamine, Fondaparinux, Ginkgo, Gossypol, Heparin, Lepirudin, Levomilnacipran, Meadowsweet, Methotrexate, Milnacipran, Nadroparin, Nefazodone, Nitisinone, Parnaparin, Paroxetine, Pemetrexed, Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium, Pentoxifylline, Pralatrexate, Prasugrel, Protein C, Reviparin, Rivaroxaban, Sertraline, Sibutramine, Tacrolimus, Ticlopidine, Tinzaparin, Tirofiban, Venlafaxine, Vilazodone, Vortioxetine, Zimeldine.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acebutolol, Acetohexamide, Alacepril, Alprenolol, Amiloride, Amlodipine, Arotinolol, Atenolol, Azilsartan Medoxomil, Azosemide, Befunolol, Bemetizide, Benazepril, Bendroflumethiazide, Benzthiazide, Bepridil, Betaxolol, Bevantolol, Bisoprolol, Bopindolol, Bucindolol, Bumetanide, Bupranolol, Buthiazide, Candesartan Cilexetil, Canrenoate, Captopril, Carteolol, Carvedilol, Celiprolol, Chlorothiazide, Chlorpropamide, Chlorthalidone, Cholestyramine, Cilazapril, Ciprofloxacin, Clopamide, Colestipol, Cyclopenthiazide, Delapril, Desvenlafaxine, Dilevalol, Diltiazem, Enalaprilat, Enalapril Maleate, Eprosartan, smolol, Ethacrynic Acid, Felodipine, Fluconazole, Flunarizine, Fosinopril, Furosemide, Gallopamil, Gliclazide, Glimepiride, Glipizide, Gliquidone, Glyburide, Hydrochlorothiazide, Hydroflumethiazide, Imidapril, Indapamide, Irbesartan, Isradipine, Labetalol, Lacidipine, Landiolol, Levobunolol, Lidoflazine, Lisinopril, Lithium, Losartan, Manidipine, Mepindolol, Methyclothiazide, Metipranolol, Metolazone, Metoprolol, Moexipril, Nadolol, Nebivolol, Nicardipine, Nifedipine, Nilvadipine, Nimodipine, Nipradilol, Nisoldipine, Nitrendipine, lmesartan Medoxomil, Oxprenolol, Penbutolol, Pentopril, Perindopril, Pindolol, Piretanide, Polythiazide, Pranidipine, Propranolol, Quinapril, Ramipril, Sotalol, Spirapril, Spironolactone, Talinolol, Tasosartan, Telmisartan, Temocapril, Tertatolol, Timolol, Tolazamide, Tolbutamide, Torsemide, Trandolapril, Triamterene, Trichlormethiazide, Valsartan, Verapamil, Xipamide, Zofenopril.

Does food or alcohol interact with gelatin?

Diclofenac may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with gelatin?

Diclofenac may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Anemia;
  • Bleeding problems;
  • Blood clots;
  • Congestive heart failure;
  • Edema (fluid retention);
  • Heart attack, history of;
  • Heart disease;
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure);
  • Kidney disease;
  • Porphyria (blood disorder);
  • Stomach ulcers or bleeding, history of;
  • Stroke, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Aspirin-sensitive asthma, history of;
  • Aspirin (or other NSAIDs) sensitivity, history of;
  • Kidney disease, severe—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Heart surgery (eg, coronary artery bypass graft [CABG] surgery)—Should not be used to relieve pain right before or after the surgery.
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.
  • Phenylketonuria (PKU)—The oral powder for solution contains phenylalanine, which can make this condition worse.

Understand the Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of Diclofenac for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis

50 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day or 75 mg orally twice a day. Doses greater than 150 mg/day are not recommended for osteoarthritis.

Diclofenac Extended-release: 100 mg orally once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Ankylosing Spondylitis

25 mg orally 4 times a day. An additional 25 mg dose may be administered at bedtime, if necessary.

Usual Adult Dose for Dysmenorrhea

50 mg orally 3 times a day. In some patients an initial dose of 100 mg of diclofenac potassium, followed by 50 mg doses, will provide better relief. After the first day, the total daily dose should generally not exceed 150 mg.

Diclofenac Potassium liquid filled capsules (Zipsor[R]) are only approved by the FDA for mild to moderate acute pain. The dosage for this product is 25 mg orally 4 times a day.

For mild to moderate acute pain in adults:
Diclofenac marketed as Zorvolex (R):
Zorvolex (R) is not interchangeable with other formulations of diclofenac. Other formulations contain a salt of diclofenac (i.e., diclofenac potassium or sodium), while Zorvolex (R) contains the free acid.
Recommended dose: 18 or 35 mg orally 3 times a day
-Taking Zorvolex (R) with food may cause a reduction in effectiveness compared to taking on an empty stomach.

Usual Adult Dose for Pain

50 mg orally 3 times a day. In some patients an initial dose of 100 mg of diclofenac potassium, followed by 50 mg doses, will provide better relief. After the first day, the total daily dose should generally not exceed 150 mg.

Diclofenac Potassium liquid filled capsules (Zipsor[R]) are only approved by the FDA for mild to moderate acute pain. The dosage for this product is 25 mg orally 4 times a day.

For mild to moderate acute pain in adults:
Diclofenac marketed as Zorvolex (R):
Zorvolex (R) is not interchangeable with other formulations of diclofenac. Other formulations contain a salt of diclofenac (i.e., diclofenac potassium or sodium), while Zorvolex (R) contains the free acid.
Recommended dose: 18 or 35 mg orally 3 times a day
-Taking Zorvolex (R) with food may cause a reduction in effectiveness compared to taking on an empty stomach.

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis

50 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day or 75 mg orally twice a day

Diclofenac Extended-release: 100 mg orally once a day

Doses greater than 225 mg/day are not recommended for rheumatoid arthritis.

Usual Adult Dose for Migraine

For acute treatment of migraine without aura:

Diclofenac potassium for oral solution packets: Mix one packet (50 mg) with 1 to 2 ounces (30 to 60 mL) water in a cup and drink immediately.

What is the dose of Diclofenac for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is diclofenac available?

Diclofenac is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

Diclofenac Sodium Extended-Release Tablets: 100 mg

Suppository: 50 mg, 100 mg

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services (115) or go to your nearest emergency room.

Symptoms of overdose may include:

  • Nausea;
  • Vomiting;
  • stomach pain;
  • bloody, black, or tarry stools;
  • vomiting a substance that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds;
  • drowsiness;
  • slow, shallow, or irregular breathing;
  • loss of consciousness.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of diclofenac , take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Review Date: May 30, 2016 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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