Generic Name: Fluconazole Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is fluconazole used for?

Fluconazole is used to prevent and treat a variety of fungal and yeast infections. It belongs to a class of drugs called azole antifungals. It works by stopping the growth of certain types of fungus.

How should I take fluconazole?

Take fluconazole by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once daily.

If you are taking the liquid suspension form of fluconazole, shake the bottle well before each dose. Carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. For children, dosage is also based on weight. Generally in children, the dose should not exceed 600 milligrams daily unless directed by the doctor.

Fluconazole works best when the amount of fluconazole in your body is kept at a constant level. Therefore, take it at the same time each day as directed.

Continue to take fluconazole until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping fluconazole too early may allow the fungus to continue to grow, which may result in a return of the infection.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or if it worsens

How do I store fluconazole?

Fluconazole is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store fluconazole in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of fluconazole that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush fluconazole down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using fluconazole?

Before taking fluconazole,

  • Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to fluconazole, other antifungal medications, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in fluconazole tablets or suspension.
  • Tell your doctor if you are taking astemizole (hismanal) (not available in the us), cisapride (propulsid) (not available in the us), erythromycin (e.e.s., e-mycin, erythrocin); pimozide (orap), quinidine (quinidex), or terfenadine (seldane) (not available in the us). Your doctor will probably tell you not to take fluconazole if you are taking any of these medications.
  • Tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking, or plan to take. Also you should tell your doctor you have taken fluconazole before starting to take any new medications within 7 days of receiving fluconazole. Be sure to mention any of the following: amitriptyline; amphotericin b, anticoagulants; benzodiazepines; calcium channel blockers, felodipine, isradipine, and nifedipine, carbamazepine, celecoxib, cholesterol-lowering medications, fluvastatin, and simvastatin, clopidogrel, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, diuretics; fentanyl; isoniazid; losartan; methadone; nevirapine; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsaids) and naproxen; oral contraceptives; oral medication for diabetes such as glipizide, glyburide, and tolbutamid; nortriptyline; phenytoin; prednisone; rifabutin; rifampin; saquinavir; sirolimus; tacrolimus; theophylline; tofacitinib; triazolam; valproic acid; vinblastine; vincristine; vitamin a; voriconazole; and zidovudine. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Many other medications may also interact with fluconazole, so be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, even those that do not appear on this list.
  • Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had cancer; acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids); an irregular heartbeat; a low level of calcium, sodium, magnesium, or potassium in your blood; rare, inherited conditions where the body is not able to tolerate lactose or sucrose;or heart, kidney, or liver disease.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the first 3 months of your pregnancy, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking fluconazole, call your doctor. Fluconazole may harm the fetus.
  • If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking fluconazole.
  • You should know that fluconazole may make you dizzy or cause seizures. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how fluconazole affects you.

Is it safe to take fluconazole during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using fluconazole during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking fluconazole. Fluconazole is pregnancy risk category  D according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of fluconazole?

Certain other drugs can cause unwanted or dangerous effects when used with fluconazole. Your doctor may need to change your treatment plan if you use any of the following drugs:

  • Halofantrine;
  • Prednisone;
  • Theophylline;
  • Tofacitinib;
  • Vitamin A;
  • An antidepressant–amitriptyline, nortriptyline;
  • Other antifungal medicine–amphotericin b or voriconazole;
  • Blood pressure medicine–hydrochlorothiazide (hctz), losartan, amlodipine, nifedipine, felodipine;
  • A blood thinner (warfarin, coumadin, jantoven);
  • Cancer medicine–cyclophosphamide, vincristine, vinblastine;
  • Cholesterol medicine–atorvastatin, simvastatin, fluvastatin;
  • Hiv/aids medicine–saquinavir, zidovudine, and others;
  • Medicine to prevent organ transplant rejection–cyclosporine, tacrolimus or sirolimus;
  • Narcotic medicine–fentanyl, alfentanil, methadone;
  • Nsaids (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)–celecoxib, ibuprofen, naproxen;
  • Oral diabetes medicine–glyburide, tolbutamide, glipizide;
  • Seizure medicine–carbamazepine, phenytoin; or
  • Tuberculosis fluconazole–rifampin, rifabutin.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with fluconazole?

Fluconazole may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, non-prescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval, especially:

  • Halofantrine;
  • Prednisone;
  • Theophylline;
  • Tofacitinib;
  • Vitamin a;
  • An antidepressant–amitriptyline, nortriptyline;
  • Other antifungal medicine–amphotericin b or voriconazole;
  • Blood pressure medicine–hydrochlorothiazide (hctz), losartan, amlodipine, nifedipine, felodipine;
  • A blood thinner (warfarin, coumadin, jantoven);
  • Cancer medicine–cyclophosphamide, vincristine, vinblastine;
  • Cholesterol medicine–atorvastatin, simvastatin, fluvastatin;
  • Hiv/aids medicine–saquinavir, zidovudine, and others;
  • Medicine to prevent organ transplant rejection–cyclosporine, tacrolimus or sirolimus;
  • Narcotic medicine–fentanyl, alfentanil, methadone;
  • Nsaids (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)–celecoxib, ibuprofen, naproxen;
  • Oral diabetes medicine–glyburide, tolbutamide, glipizide;
  • Seizure medicine–carbamazepine, phenytoin; or
  • Tuberculosis medication–rifampin, rifabutin.

Does food or alcohol interact with fluconazole?

Fluconazolemay interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with fluconazole?

Fluconazolemay interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Electrolyte problems (mineral imbalance).
  • Heart disease—Use with caution. These conditions may increase your chance of having heart rhythm problems and make the effects of this medicine worse.
  • Fructose intolerance (rare hereditary problem).
  • Galactose intolerance (rare hereditary problem).
  • Glucose-galactose malabsorption (rare hereditary problem).
  • Lapp lactase deficiency (rare hereditary problem).
  • Sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (rare hereditary problem).
  • Any condition that makes it hard for you to digest sugars or dairy products—Use with caution. The capsule form of this medicine contains lactose (milk sugar) and the oral liquid contains sucrose (table sugar), which can make these conditions worse.
  • Heart rhythm problems (eg, QT prolongation).
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Kidney disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Understand the dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using fluconazole.

What is the dose of fluconazole for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Vaginal Candidiasis: 150 mg orally as a single dose

Usual Adult Dose for Oral Thrush: Oropharyngeal candidiasis: 200 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 100 mg IV or orally once a day
Duration of therapy: At least 2 weeks, to reduce the risk of relapse

Usual Adult Dose for Candidemia: Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Pneumonia: Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Infection – Disseminated: Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Usual Adult Dose for Systemic Candidiasis: Doses up to 400 mg/day have been used.

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis: 200 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 100 mg IV or orally once a day
Duration of therapy: At least 3 weeks and for at least 2 weeks after symptoms resolve

Usual Adult Dose for Candida Urinary Tract Infection: 50 to 200 mg IV or orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Peritonitis: 50 to 200 mg IV or orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis – Immunocompetent Host: Acute infection: 400 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 200 mg IV or orally once a day. Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis – Immunosuppressed Host:  Acute infection: 400 mg IV or orally on the first day followed by 200 mg IV or orally once a day. Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative

Usual Adult Dose for Cryptococcosis IDSA Recommendations: Mild to moderate pulmonary infection and nonmeningeal, nonpulmonary infection if CNS disease ruled out, no fungemia, single site of infection, no immunosuppressive risk factors: 400 mg orally once a day for 6 to 12 months

Usual Adult Dose for Fungal Infection Prophylaxis: 400 mg IV or orally once a day
Duration of therapy: 7 days after neutrophil count rises above 1000 cells/mm3.

Usual Adult Dose for Coccidioidomycosis – Meningitis: IDSA Recommendations: 400 mg orally once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Coccidioidomycosis: IDSA Recommendations: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Histoplasmosis: IDSA Recommendations:

  • Disseminated infections in patients without AIDS: 200 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day for at least 12 months
  • CNS infection (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 200 to 400 mg IV or orally once a day for 12 months

Usual Adult Dose for Blastomycosis:

  • IDSA Recommendations: Mild to moderate pulmonary infection or mild to moderate disseminated infection without CNS involvement: 400 to 800 mg orally once a day for at least 6 to 12 months
  • CNS infection (after initial regimen of IV amphotericin B): 800 mg orally once a day for at least 12 months and until CSF abnormalities resolve.

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis – Fingernail:

Some experts recommend: 150 to 300 mg orally once a week. Duration of therapy:

  • fingernail infections: 3 to 6 months;
  • toenail infections: 6 to 12 months;

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis – Toenail: Some experts recommend: 150 to 300 mg orally once a week. Duration of therapy:

  • fingernail infections: 3 to 6 months;
  • toenail infections: 6 to 12 months;

Usual Adult Dose for Sporotrichosis: IDSA Recommendations:

  • Cutaneous or lymphocutaneous infection: 400 to 800 mg IV or orally once a day.
  • Duration of therapy: 2 to 4 weeks after all lesions resolve (usually 3 to 6 months total).

What is the dose of fluconazole for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Esophageal Candidiasis: 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 3 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours.

  • Older than 2 weeks: 6 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 3 mg/kg IV or orally once a day;
  • Duration of therapy: At least 3 weeks and for at least 2 weeks after symptoms resolve;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Oral Thrush: Oropharyngeal candidiasis:

  • 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 3 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours;
  • Older than 2 weeks: 6 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 3 mg/kg IV or orally once a day;
  • Duration of therapy: At least 2 weeks, to reduce the risk of relapse;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Candidemia:

  • 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours;
  • Older than 2 weeks: 6 to 12 mg/kg/day IV or orally;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fungal Infection – Disseminated:

  • 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours;
  • Older than 2 weeks: 6 to 12 mg/kg/day IV or orally;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Systemic Candidiasis:

  • 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours;
  • Older than 2 weeks: 6 to 12 mg/kg/day IV or orally;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis – Immunocompetent Host: Acute infection:

  • 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours;
  • Older than 2 weeks: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day;
  • Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcal Meningitis – Immunosuppressed Host: Acute infection:

  • 2 weeks or younger (gestational age 26 to 29 weeks): 6 mg/kg IV or orally every 72 hours;
  • Older than 2 weeks: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day;
  • Duration of therapy: 10 to 12 weeks after CSF culture is negative;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cryptococcosis: IDSA Recommendations for children:

Disseminated disease:

  • consolidation therapy (after induction therapy): 10 to 12 mg/kg/day orally in 2 divided doses for 8 weeks;
  • maintenance therapy in hiv-infected patients: 6 mg/kg orally once a day
    cryptococcal pneumonia: 6 to 12 mg/kg orally once a day for 6 to 12 months;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fungal Infection Prophylaxis: IDSA Recommendations:

  • Empiric therapy for suspected candidiasis in nonneutropenic or neutropenic patients: 12 mg/kg IV or orally on the first day followed by 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Candida Urinary Tract Infection: IDSA Recommendations:

  • Asymptomatic cystitis in patients undergoing urologic procedures: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for several days before and after the procedure.
  • Symptomatic cystitis: 3 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks.
  • Pyelonephritis: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day for 2 weeks.
  • Urinary fungus balls: 3 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally once a day until symptoms resolve and urine cultures clear of Candida.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Coccidioidomycosis – Meningitis: US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children:

  • Meningeal infection: 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day;
  • Maximum dose: 800 mg/dose;
  • Secondary prophylaxis: 6 mg/kg orally once a day;
  • Maximum dose: 400 mg/dose;
  • Duration of therapy: Lifelong;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Coccidioidomycosis: US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children:

Severe illness with respiratory compromise due to diffuse pulmonary or disseminated nonmeningeal infection: 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day

  • maximum dose: 800 mg/dose;
  • duration of therapy: 1 year total;

Mild to moderate nonmeningeal infection (e.g., focal pneumonia): 6 to 12 mg/kg IV or orally once a day. Maximum dose: 400 mg/dose

Secondary prophylaxis: 6 mg/kg orally once a day

  • maximum dose: 400 mg/dose;
  • duration of therapy: lifelong in patients with disseminated disease;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vaginal Candidiasis: US CDC, NIH, and IDSA Recommendations for HIV-infected Adolescents:

  • Uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally as a single dose;
  • Severe or recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: 100 to 200 mg orally once a day for at least 7 days;
  • Suppressive therapy for vulvovaginal candidiasis: 150 mg orally once a week;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Histoplasmosis: US CDC, NIH, IDSA, PIDS, and AAP Recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected Children:

Acute primary pulmonary infection: 3 to 6 mg/kg orally once a day. Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose;

Mild disseminated disease: 5 to 6 mg/kg IV or orally twice a day;

  • maximum dose: 300 mg/dose;
  • duration of therapy: 12 months;
  • Secondary prophylaxis: 3 to 6 mg/kg orally once a day. Maximum dose: 200 mg/dose.

How is fluconazole available?

Fluconazole is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Solution, Intravenous: 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg;
  • Solution, Intravenous [preservative free]: 200 mg, 400 mg;
  • Suspension Reconstituted, Oral: 10 mg/mL (35 mL), 40 mg/mL (35 mL);
  • Tablet, Oral: 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, 200 mg;

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of fluconazole, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Review Date: January 4, 2017 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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