Equal

By Medically reviewed by hellodoktor

Generic Name: Equal Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Uses

What is Equal® (Aspartame) used for?

Equal® is one of six artificial sweeteners approved by FDA (Food and Drug Administration, US) for using in people with diabetes because it has no effect on blood sugar, offer no calories. Other sweeteners in this group contain acesulfame potassium (also called acesulfame K); saccharin; sucralose; neotame; advantame.

How should I take Equal® (Aspartame)?

Equal® is commonly used by food company in producing diet products or products for patients with diabetes, such as diet drinks, baked goods, frozen desserts, candy, light yogurt and chewing gum. Also, Equal® can be used in normal dishes at your home.

Consult your doctor for any information if you do not clearly understand about using these artificial sweeteners and your diabetes situation.

Equal® is contradicted in people with Phenylketonuria syndrome.

How do I store Equal® (Aspartame)?

Equal® is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Equal® in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Equal® that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Equal® (Aspartame)?

Before using Equal®, tell your doctor if you have:

  • Allergic reaction: to Equal®, excipients using for dosage form containing Equal®. The information is detailed in the leaflet.
  • Allergic reaction to any other medicines, foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals.
  • Pediatric.
  • Geriatric.
  • Used any other health conditions, drugs that have a risk of interaction with Equal®.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breastfeeding?

There isn’t enough information about the safety of using Equal® during pregnancy and breastfeeding. However, Equal® is approved by FDA for using in women in pregnancy. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking Equal®.

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Equal® (Aspartame)?

As taking others medicines, taking Equal® can cause some side effects. Most of them are rarely occurring and do not need any supplementary treatment. However, it is always important for you to consult your doctor if you have any problem after taking this medicine.

Some of the side effects are listed below:

  • Blindness in one or both eyes;
  • Decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision;
  • Decreased night vision;
  • Pain in one or both eyes;
  • Decreased tears;
  • Trouble with contact lenses;
  • Bulging eyes;
  • Tinnitus – ringing or buzzing sound;
  • Severe intolerance of noise;
  • Marked hearing impair;
  • Epileptic seizures;
  • Headaches, migraines and (some severe);
  • Dizziness, unsteadiness, both;
  • Confusion, memory loss, both;
  • Severe drowsiness and sleepiness;
  • Paresthesia or numbness of the limbs;
  • Severe slurring of speech;
  • Severe hyperactivity and restless legs;
  • Atypical facial pain;
  • Severe tremors.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Equal® (Aspartame)?

Equal® may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval, such as medications for schizophrenia.

Does food or alcohol interact with Equal® (Aspartame)?

Equal® may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Equal® (Aspartame)?

Equal® may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Tardive Dyskinesia;
  • Phenylketonuria.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using Equal® (Aspartame).

What is the dose of Equal® (Aspartame) for an adult?

Consult your doctor for information about the dose of Equal® hydrochloride.

Recommended doses in some cases are listed below:

  • According to FDA: 50 milligrams per kilogram of body weight;
  • According to EFSA: 40 milligrams per kilogram of body weight;

What is the dose of Equal® (Aspartame) for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is Equal® (Aspartame) available?

Equal® is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Tablet 19 mg;
  • Powder in Sachet: 38 mg;
  • Powder in bottle: 40 mg;

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

Overdose occurs extremely rare. In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services (115) or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

As mentioned above, Equal® is used in the normal diet. It is no important problem occurring if you miss a dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Review Date: October 9, 2016 | Last Modified: September 13, 2019

Sources
You might also like