Generic Name: Deferoxamine Brand Name(s): Deferoxamine.

Uses

What is Deferoxamine used for?

Deferoxamine is commonly used along with other treatments (such as causing vomiting with syrup of ipecac, stomach pumping) to treat sudden iron poisoning. It is most effective when given as soon as possible after the iron was eaten. This medication can also be used to help get rid of iron in patients with high iron levels due to many blood transfusions. Deferoxamine is an iron-binding agent that belongs to a class of drugs known as heavy metal antagonists. It works by helping the kidneys and gallbladder get rid of the extra iron.

This medication is not recommended for use in children less than 3 years old.

How should I take Deferoxamine?

Depending upon your medical condition, this medication is injected directly into a muscle, under the skin, or into a vein as directed by your doctor.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.

If you are giving this medication to yourself at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.

If you are using this medication to treat high iron levels, your doctor may direct you to take vitamin C (ascorbic acid) after you have been using this medication for at least 1 month. Taking vitamin C will help replace the loss of vitamin C due to high iron levels and help the medication work to get rid of the iron. If you have heart disease (such as heart failure), tell your doctor before taking vitamin C while using this medication (see also Drug Interactions). The manufacturer recommends that adults using this drug take no more than 200 milligrams of vitamin C a day.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

How do I store Deferoxamine?

Store at 20o to 25oC (68o to 77 oF). The product should be used immediately after reconstitution (commencement of treatment within 3 hours) for microbiological safety. When reconstitution is carried out under validated aseptic conditions (in a sterile laminar flow hood using aseptic technique), the product may be stored at room temperature for a maximum period of 24 hours before use. Do not refrigerate reconstituted solution. Reconstituting Deferoxamine mesylate for injection in solvents or under conditions other than indicated may result in precipitation. Turbid solutions should not be used.

If you need to store deferoxamine at home, talk with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Deferoxamine?

Before using deferoxamine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: kidney problems, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, any fungal infection.

If you are using this medication for aluminum poisoning, also tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have: seizures, decreased calcium levels in the blood, hyperparathyroidism.

This drug may make you dizzy or cause blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

Children (especially those younger than 3 years of age) may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially the effects on bone growth.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially vision/hearing problems.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown whether this drug passes into breast milk. Because of the possible risk to the infant, breast-feeding while using this medication is not recommended. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this Deferoxamine during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking this Deferoxamine. This Deferoxamine is pregnancy risk category C according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Deferoxamine?

Pain and swelling at the injection site or blurred vision may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

This medicine may cause your urine to turn reddish. This effect is harmless.

When this medication is given into a vein, flushing, severe itching, severe dizziness, fast heartbeat, and fainting can occur. Therefore the manufacturer recommends that, when possible, this medication be given either in the muscle or under the skin.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: other vision changes (such as vision loss, loss of color vision, cataracts), eye pain, hearing changes (such as ringing ears, decreased hearing/loss).

Rarely, this drug may cause serious (sometimes fatal) bacterial or fungal infections. Get medical help right away if you notice any of the following: unexplained diarrhea/abdominal pain/fever.

This drug may rarely cause a serious (rarely fatal) lung condition (acute respiratory distress syndrome or ARDS). Get medical help right away if you notice any of the following: sudden/severe shortness of breath, labored or rapid breathing, severe dizziness.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Deferoxamine?

Some of the products that may interact with this drug include: prochlorperazine.

If you have a certain heart problem (heart failure), this drug should not be used with vitamin C (ascorbic acid) because very serious interactions may occur. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details before starting deferoxamine.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including gallium scintigraphy), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Deferoxamine may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Deferoxamine?

Deferoxamine may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Deferoxamine?

Deferoxamine may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Deferoxamine.

What is the dose of Deferoxamine for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Iron Poisoning – Acute

Initial dose: 1000 mg, IM or IV (maximum IV rate: 15 mg/kg/hour)

Maintenance dose: 500 mg, IM or IV, every 4 hours, for 2 doses; additional 500 mg doses every 4 to 12 hours may be given based on clinical response

Maximum dose: 6000 mg per 24 hour period

Comments:

-IM administration is preferred for all patients not in shock.

-Slow IV administration should only be used for cardiovascular collapse.

-As soon as the clinical condition allows, discontinue IV and switch to IM administration.

-This drug is an adjunct to, not a substitute for, standard treatment for acute iron intoxication (e.g. inducing emesis, gastric lavage)

Use: Acute iron poisoning

Usual Adult Dose for Iron Poisoning – Chronic

1000 to 2000 mg, subcutaneously over 8 to 24 hours, daily

or

40 to 50 mg/kg/day, IV over 8 to 12 hours (maximum IV rate: 15 mg/kg/hour), 5 to 7 days per week

Maximum IV dose: 60 mg/kg/day

or

500 to 1000 mg, IM,

Maximum IM dose: 1000 mg/day

Comments:

-Subcutaneous administration is recommended.

-Intravenous administration can be used in patients with intravenous access.

Use: Chronic iron overload

Renal Dose Adjustments

Contraindicated in severe renal impairment

Dose Adjustments

Chronic Iron Overload:

-Poorly compliant patients can receive their IV dose prior to or following same day blood transfusion.

-Do not administer concomitantly with blood transfusion: errors in interpreting side effects can occur.

Dialysis

Deferoxamine is dialyzable; however, no dose adjustment guidelines have been reported.

Other Comments

Administration advice:

-Administer immediately (starting within 3 hours) after reconstitution.

What is the dose of Deferoxamine for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Iron Poisoning – Acute

3 years and older:

Initial dose: 1000 mg, IM or IV (maximum IV rate: 15 mg/kg/hour)

Maintenance dose: 500 mg, IM or IV, every 4 hours, for 2 doses; additional 500 mg doses every 4 to 12 hours may be given based on clinical response

Maximum dose: 6000 mg per 24 hour period

Comments:

-IM administration is preferred for all patients not in shock.

-Slow IV administration should only be used for cardiovascular collapse.

-As soon as the clinical condition allows, discontinue IV and switch to IM administration.

-This drug is an adjunct to, not a substitute for, standard treatment for acute iron intoxication (e.g. inducing emesis, gastric lavage)

Use: Acute iron poisoning

Usual Pediatric Dose for Iron Poisoning – Chronic

3 years and older:

1000 to 2000 mg, subcutaneously over 8 to 24 hours, daily

or

20 to 40 mg/kg/day, IV over 8 to 12 hours (maximum IV rate: 15 mg/kg/hour), 5 to 7 days per week

Maximum IV dose: 40 mg/kg/day (until growth has ceased)

or

500 to 1000 mg, IM,

Maximum IM dose: 1000 mg/day

Comments:

-Monitor for body weight and growth every 3 months.

-Subcutaneous administration is recommended.

-Intravenous administration can be used in patients with intravenous access.

Use: Chronic iron overload

Precautions

Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 3 years.

How is Deferoxamine available?

Deferoxamine is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Injectable powder for injection

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Deferoxamine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: January 19, 2018 | Last Modified: January 19, 2018

Want to live your best life?
Get the Hello Doktor Daily newsletter for health tips, wellness updates and more.