Generic Name: Ceftriaxone Brand Name(s): Oframax.

Know the basics

What is ceftriaxone used for?

Ceftriaxone is an antibiotic used to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections. It belongs to  antibiotic drug class called cephalosporins. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

Antibiotics such as cefoxitin will not work for viral infections such as colds and flu. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk of getting an infection later that resists antibiotic treatment. Please take only as instructed by your doctor.

Ceftriaxone may also be used before dental procedures in patients with certain heart conditions (such as artificial heart valves) to help prevent serious infection of the heart (bacterial endocarditis).

How should I take ceftriaxone?

Ceftriaxone is given by injection into a muscle or vein as directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy.

This may be given to you to be used at home. Please follow the instructions given by your doctor.

Continue to use this medication until the fully prescribed treatment period is finished, even if symptoms disappear after a few days. Stopping the medication too early may allow bacteria to continue to grow, which may result in a return of the infection.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

How do I store ceftriaxone?

Ceftriaxone is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store ceftriaxone in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of ceftriaxone that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush ceftriaxone down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using ceftriaxone?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ceftriaxone, or to other cephalosporin antibiotics, such as:

  • cefaclor (Raniclor); cefadroxil (Duricef); cefazolin (Ancef); cefdinir Omnicef); cefditoren (Spectracef); cefpodoxime (Vantin); cefprozil (Cefzil); ceftibuten (Cedax); cefuroxime (Ceftin); cephalexin (Keflex); cephradine (Velosef).

To make sure you can safely use ceftriaxone, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
  • liver disease;
  • diabetes;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • a stomach or intestinal disorder such as colitis;
  • if you are malnourished; or
  • if you are allergic to penicillin.

Is it safe to take ceftriaxone during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this medication during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking this medication. This medication is pregnancy risk category B according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown.

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of ceftriaxone?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
  • fever, chills, swollen glands, rash or itching, joint pain, or general ill feeling;
  • white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips;
  • unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;
  • skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;
  • pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness;
  • urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • swelling, pain, or irritation where the injection was given;
  • chalky-colored stools, stomach pain just after eating a meal, nausea, heartburn, bloating, and severe upper stomach pain that may spread to your back; or
  • severe skin reaction — fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • a hard lump where the injection was given;
  • nausea, vomiting, upset stomach;
  • headache, dizziness, overactive reflexes;
  • pain or swelling in your tongue;
  • sweating; or
  • vaginal itching or discharge.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with ceftriaxone?

Ceftriaxone may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, non-prescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Calcium Acetate, Calcium Chloride, Calcium Gluceptate, Calcium Gluconate, Lactated Ringer’s Solution, Ringer’s Solution.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Does food or alcohol interact with ceftriaxone?

Ceftriaxone may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with ceftriaxone?

Ceftriaxone may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have, especially:

  • Anemia;
  • Diarrhea;
  • Gallbladder disease;
  • Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas);
  • Stomach or bowel disease (e.g., colitis), history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Hyperbilirubinemia (high bilirubin in the blood)—Should not be used in newborn (less than 28 days of age) and premature infants with this condition.
  • Kidney disease;
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. Effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.
  • Liver disease, severe;
  • Undernourished condition—May be worsened by ceftriaxone and you may need to take Vitamin K.

Understand the dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of Ceftriaxone for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Infection:

1 to 2 g/day intravenous or intramuscular in 1 to 2 divided doses, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

For infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-susceptible, MSSA), the recommended dose is 2 to 4 g/day, in order to achieve greater than 90% target attainment.

The total daily dose should not exceed 4 g.

Usual Adult Dose for Bacteremia:

2 g intravenous every 24 hours for 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Chancroid:

250 mg intramuscular as a single dose

The causative organism is Haemophilus ducreyi.

HIV-infected patients may require longer treatment. Ceftriaxone should only be given if patient follow-up can be guaranteed.

Patients should be retested for syphilis and HIV in 3 months, if initial tests were negative. The patient’s sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Conjunctivitis:

Gonococcal Conjunctivitis: 1 g intramuscular once

Doxycycline therapy for 7 days (if not pregnant) or single dose azithromycin is also recommended to treat possible concurrent chlamydial infection.

The patient’s sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Epididymitis — Sexually Transmitted:

Gonococcal epididymitis: 250 mg intramuscular as a single dose

Doxycycline 100 mg twice daily orally for 10 days should be given to treat a concurrent chlamydial infection.

The patient’s sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Epiglottitis:

2 g intravenous every 24 hours for 7 to 10 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroenteritis:

2 g intravenous every 24 hours

Duration: 7 to 10 days in immunocompromised patients.

What is the dose of Ceftriaxone for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Infection:

Less than 1 week: 50 mg/kg intravenous or intramuscular every 24 hours

1 to 4 weeks, 2000 g or less: 50 mg/kg intravenous or intramuscular every 24 hours

1 to 4 weeks, greater than 2000 g: 50 to 75 mg/kg IV or IM every 24 hours

Ceftriaxone should be avoided in neonates with hyperbilirubinemia.

1 month or older:

Severe: 50 to 75 mg/kg intravenous in divided doses every 12 to 24 hours (maximum dose: 2 g/24 hours)

Life-threatening: 80 to 100 mg/kg intravenous in 1 or 2 divided doses (maximum dose: 4 g/24 hours)

Usual Pediatric Dose for Meningitis:

0 to 4 weeks: 50 to 75 mg/kg every 24 hours

Ceftriaxone should be avoided in neonates with hyperbilirubinemia.

1 month or older:

Initial dose: 100 mg/kg intravenous at the start of therapy (maximum dose: 4 g)

Maintenance dose: 100 mg/kg/day intravenous once a day or in divided doses every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days (maximum dose: 4 g/24 hours)

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gonococcal infection:

45 kg or less: 50 mg/kg/day intravenous or intramuscular divided every 12 hours for 10 to 14 days (maximum dose: 2 g/day)

Greater than 45 kg: 1 to 2 g intravenous or intramuscular every 12 hours for 10 to 14 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Meningococcal Meningitis Prophylaxis:

Less than 15 years: 125 mg intramuscular once.

15 years or older: 250 mg intramuscular once.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Endocarditis:

Gonococcal infection:

45 kg or less: 50 mg/kg/day intravenous or intramuscular divided every 12 hours for at least 28 days (maximum dose: 2 g/day)

Greater than 45 kg: 1 to 2 g intravenous or intramuscular every 12 hours for at least 28 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis:

As an alternative in patients unable to take oral medication, with or without penicillin allergy (non-anaphylactoid type): 50 mg/kg (maximum dose: 1 g) intravenous or intramuscular once 30 to 60 minutes before procedure

Usual Pediatric Dose for Otitis Media:

Acute bacterial otitis media: 50 mg/kg intramuscular once (maximum dose: 1 g)

Persistent or relapsing acute otitis media: 50 mg/kg intravenous or intramuscular once a day for 3 days (maximum dose: 1 g/day)

Ceftriaxone should be avoided in neonates with hyperbilirubinemia (a condition that causes too much bilirubin in the blood).

How is ceftriaxone available?

Ceftriaxone is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

Ceftriaxone is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Solution, intravenous: 20mg/ml, 40mg/ml
  • Solution, injection: 250mg, 500mg, 1g, 2g

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of ceftriaxone, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: January 4, 2017 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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