Calcium gluconate

By Medically reviewed by hellodoktor

Generic Name: Calcium gluconate Brand Name(s): Calcium gluconate, Calcium gluconate and Calcium gluconate.

Uses

What is calcium gluconate used for?

Calcium gluconate is commonly used to prevent or treat low blood calcium levels in people who do not get enough calcium from their diets.

It may be used to treat conditions such as bone loss (osteoporosis), weak bones (osteomalacia/rickets), decreased activity of the parathyroid gland (hypoparathyroidism), and a certain muscle disease (latent tetany).

It may also be used in certain patients to make sure they are getting enough calcium (e.g., women who are pregnant, nursing, or postmenopausal, people taking certain medications such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, or prednisone).

How should I take calcium gluconate?

Calcium gluconate works best if you take it with food. Take calcium gluconate with a full glass of water.

Use calcium gluconate exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

How do I store calcium gluconate?

Calcium gluconate is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store calcium gluconate in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of calcium gluconate that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush calcium gluconate down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using calcium gluconate?

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take calcium gluconate if you have:

Is it safe during pregnancy or breastfeeding?

Talk to your doctor before taking calcium gluconate if you are pregnant. Your dose may be different during pregnancy.

Talk to your doctor before taking calcium gluconate if you are breastfeeding a baby. Your dose may be different while you are nursing.

Side effects

What side effects can occur from calcium gluconate?

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Decreased appetite
  • Constipation
  • Dry mouth or increased thirst
  • Increased urination

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to calcium gluconate such as hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with calcium gluconate?

Calcium gluconate may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Calcium gluconate can make it harder for your body to absorb other medications you take by mouth. Tell your doctor if you are taking:

  • Digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps)
  • Antacids or other calcium supplements
  • Calcitriol (Rocaltrol) or vitamin D supplements
  • Doxycycline (Doryx, Oracea, Periostat, Vibramycin)
  • Minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn)
  • Tetracycline (Ala-Tet, Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap)

Does food or alcohol interact with calcium gluconate?

Calcium gluconate may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with calcium gluconate?

Calcium gluconate may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using calcium gluconate.

What is the dose of calcium gluconate for an adult?

Usual adult dose for hypocalcemia:

  • Intravenous:

500 to 2000 mg (5 to 20 ml) IV one time at a rate, not to exceed 0.5 to 2 ml/min. The dose may be increased as needed. The usual daily dosage ranges from 1000 to 15,000 mg (10 to 150 ml) in divided doses or as a continuous infusion. Doses may be repeated every 1 to 3 days as needed and tolerated to normalize the serum calcium level.

  • Oral:

500 to 2000 mg orally 2 to 4 times a day.

Usual adult dose for hypermagnesemia:

1000 to 2000 mg (10 to 20 ml) IV one time at a rate, not to exceed 0.5 to 2 ml/min. This dose may be repeated as necessary in severe cases of hypermagnesemia (where discontinuation of exogenous magnesium is inadequate) to temporarily reverse many of the toxic effects of magnesium in the central nervous system.

Usual adult dose for hyperkalemia:

500 to 3000 mg (5 to 30 ml) IV one time at a rate not to exceed 0.5 to 2 ml/min. This dose may be repeated as necessary in cases of extreme hyperkalemia cardiotoxicity when P waves are absent, the QRS complexes are widened, and when continuous ECG monitoring is available. The use of calcium does not reduce the serum potassium level, but counteracts the effects of hyperkalemia on cardiac excitability.

Usual adult dose for exchange transfusion:

300 mg (3 ml) IV one time with each 100 ml of citrated blood at a rate, not to exceed 0.5 to 2 ml/min.

Usual adult dose for osteoporosis:

1000 to 1500 mg/day orally in divided doses.

What is the dose of calcium gluconate for a child?

Usual pediatric dose for hypocalcemia:

  • IV:

< 1 month: 200 to 800 mg/kg/day as a continuous infusion or in divided doses every 6 hours.

>= 1 month: 200 to 500 mg/kg/day as a continuous infusion or in divided doses every 6 hours.

  • Oral:

>= 1 year: 200 to 500 mg/kg/day in 4 divided doses.

How is calcium gluconate available?

Calcium gluconate is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Calcium gluconate tablets 500mg
  • Calcium gluconate injection 10%

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of calcium gluconate, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: December 16, 2016 | Last Modified: September 12, 2019

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