What is acetylcholine?

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Generic Name: Acetylcholine Brand Name(s): Generics only. No brands available.

Know the basics

What is acetylcholine used for?

Acetylcholine is an eye medicine that is used to constrict the pupils of your eye seconds after a cataract surgery or other eye surgeries.

Acetylcholine belongs to a group of medicines called parasympathomimetics and works by mediating nerve impulse transmission.

How should I take acetylcholine?

Your doctor will administer this medication. Please do not use at home unless instructed otherwise by your doctor. Please consult your doctor.

Acetylcholine should be prepared immediately before use. Your doctor will discard any unused solution after opening Miochol-E.

Do not drive or operate machinery until you have recovered from your eye surgery and your vision is normal.

How do I store acetylcholine?

Acetylcholine is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store acetylcholine in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of acetylcholine that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush acetylcholine down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using acetylcholine?

You must not be given acetylcholine if you have an allergy to:

  • Any medicine containing acetylcholine chloride;
  • Any of the ingredients listed at the end of this leaflet.

Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include

  • Shortness of breath;
  • Wheezing or difficulty breathing;
  • Swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body;
  • Rash, itching or hives on the skin.

You must not be given acetylcholine after the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal.

If you are not sure whether you should be given this medicine, talk to your doctor.

Is it safe to take acetylcholine during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this medication during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking this medication. This medication is pregnancy risk category B according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of acetylcholine?

Applies to dexchlorpheniramine: controlled-release tablets, syrup

Check with your doctor if any of these most common side effects persist or become bothersome: Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth, nose, or throat; excitability; headache; loss of appetite; nausea; nervousness or anxiety; trouble sleeping; upset stomach; vomiting; weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these severe side effects occur while taking dexchlorpheniramine:

  • Severe allergic reactions: rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue;
  • Difficulty urinating or inability to urinate;
  • Fast or irregular heartbeat;
  • Hallucinations;
  • Seizures;
  • Severe dizziness,
  • Lightheadedness, or headache;
  • Tremor;
  • Trouble sleeping;
  • Vision changes.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with acetylcholine?

Dexchlorpheniramine may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: antihistamines applied to the skin (such as diphenhydramine cream, ointment, spray), antispasmodics (e.g., atropine, belladonna alkaloids), MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine), drugs for Parkinson’s disease (e.g., anticholinergics such as benztropine, trihexyphenidyl), scopolamine, tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline).

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you also take drugs that cause drowsiness such as: certain antihistamines (e.g., diphenhydramine), anti-seizure drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), medicine for sleep or anxiety (e.g., alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants, narcotic pain relievers (e.g., codeine), psychiatric medicines (e.g., chlorpromazine, risperidone, amitriptyline, trazodone). Check the labels on all your medicines (e.g., cough-and-cold products) because they may contain drowsiness-causing ingredients. Ask your pharmacist about the safe use of those products.

Dexchlorpheniramine is very similar to chlorpheniramine. Do not use medications containing chlorpheniramine while using dexchlorpheniramine.

Dexchlorpheniramine may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including allergy skin testing), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Does food or alcohol interact with acetylcholine?

Dexchlorpheniramine may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increase the risk for serious side effects. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with acetylcholine?

Dexchlorpheniramine may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Understand the Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of Dexchlorpheniramine for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Allergic Reaction

  • Initial dose: 2 mg (1 teaspoonful) orally every 4 to 6 hours, or 4 to 6 mg of the timed-release preparation at bedtime or every 8 to 10 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Allergic Rhinitis

  • Initial dose: 2 mg (1 teaspoonful) orally every 4 to 6 hours, or 4 to 6 mg of the timed-release preparation at bedtime or every 8 to 10 hours.

What is the dose of Dexchlorpheniramine for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Allergic Reaction

  • 2 years to 5 years: 0.5 mg (1/4 teaspoonful) every 4 to 6 hours for children 2 to 5 years old (do not use timed release).
  • 6 years to 11 years: 1 mg (1/2 teaspoonful) every 4 to 6 hours, or 4 mg of the timed-release preparation at bedtime.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Allergic Rhinitis

  • 2 years to 5 years: 0.5 mg (1/4 teaspoonful) every 4 to 6 hours for children 2 to 5 years old (do not use timed release).
  • 6 years to 11 years: 1 mg (1/2 teaspoonful) every 4 to 6 hours, or 4 mg of the timed-release preparation at bedtime.

How is dexchlorpheniramine available?

Dexchlorpheniramine is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

Dexchlorpheniramine Maleate Oral Solution, USP 2 mg/5 mL is supplied as a red-orange colored, orange flavored liquid in the following sizes:

16 fl oz (473 mL).

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

Symptoms may include: blurred vision; confusion; hallucinations; seizures; severe dizziness, lightheadedness, or headache; severe drowsiness; unusually fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat; and vomiting.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of dexchlorpheniramine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Review Date: January 4, 2017 | Last Modified: January 4, 2017

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